Urban Ecology
A Field Guide to the Natural World of the Twin Cities
A Field Guide to the Natural World of the Twin Cities
Paperback      ISBN: 1517905494

An illustrated guide to the natural habitats and rich diversity of wildlife in the greater Minneapolis and St. Paul metro area



Though the Twin Cities and environs have proven a fine habitat for one particular species, the three million humans who call the area home share these 3,000 square miles with myriad animals and plants, all in a mosaic of various ecosystems. While most of the region's wildlife has lost its original habitat to agriculture and urban development, a significant patchwork of native and restored habitat remains--prairies, woods, and wetlands, along with pockets in the parks and open spaces throughout the cities and suburbs. This easy-to-use guide gives novice and long-time naturalists alike the tools to find and explore these natural places in the metropolitan Twin Cities, some within the city limits and all within an hour's drive of downtown Minneapolis.

John J. Moriarty is a congenial expert on the remarkable diversity of plants and animals in the region's habitats, from prairies and savannas to woods and wetlands such as swamps and marshes, to fens and bogs, lakes and rivers, and urban and suburban spots. Featuring Siah L. St. Clair's remarkable photographs, maps, and commentary on natural history, this field guide invites readers to investigate the Twin Cities' wildlife--familiar and obscure, sun-loving or nocturnal, shy or easily observed. Here are snapping turtles, otters, and Cooper's hawks, the wild lupines, white water lilies, and sprawling white oaks, among hundreds of species found in the wild, the park, or even the backyard. Including notes on invasive species and a list of references and organizations, this book is a perfect companion and an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in discovering the rich natural world of the Twin Cities.

Darwin Comes to Town: How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution
Darwin Comes to Town
How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution
Paperback      ISBN: 125012784x

From evolutionary biologist Menno Schilthuizen, a book that will make you see yourself and the world around you in an entirely new way

*Carrion crows in the Japanese city of Sendai have learned to use passing traffic to crack nuts.

*Lizards in Puerto Rico are evolving feet that better grip surfaces like concrete.

*Europe's urban blackbirds sing at a higher pitch than their rural cousins, to be heard over the din of traffic.

How is this happening?

Menno Schilthuizen is one of a growing number of "urban ecologists" studying how our manmade environments are accelerating and changing the evolution of the animals and plants around us. In Darwin Comes to Town, he takes us around the world for an up-close look at just how stunningly flexible and swift-moving natural selection can be.

With human populations growing, we're having an increasing impact on global ecosystems, and nowhere do these impacts overlap as much as they do in cities. The urban environment is about as extreme as it gets, and the wild animals and plants that live side-by-side with us need to adapt to a whole suite of challenging conditions: they must manage in the city's hotter climate (the "urban heat island"); they need to be able to live either in the semidesert of the tall, rocky, and cavernous structures we call buildings or in the pocket-like oases of city parks (which pose their own dangers, including smog and free-rangingdogs and cats); traffic causes continuous noise, a mist of fine dust particles, and barriers to movement for any animal that cannot fly or burrow; food sources are mainly human-derived. And yet, as Schilthuizen shows, the wildlife sharing these spaces with us is not just surviving, but evolving ways of thriving.

Darwin Comes toTown draws on eye-popping examples of adaptation to share a stunning vision of urban evolution in which humans and wildlife co-exist in a unique harmony. It reveals that evolution can happen far more rapidly than Darwin dreamed, while providing a glimmer of hope that our race toward over population might not take the rest of nature down with us.

Tales from Concrete Jungles: Urban Birding Around the World
Tales from Concrete Jungles
Urban Birding Around the World
Hardcover      ISBN: 1472918371

When you think about going bird-watching, you imagine visiting magnificent open countryside, rolling hills, lush woodland, or waterlogged marshes. You don't think of towns and cities. In fact, the urban environment is surprisingly rich in birds: parks, gardens, scrubland, lakes, and reservoirs all harbor many species of birds. Some town gardens even have bigger lists of birds than country gardens do.

Since 2006, a long-running series of articles has appeared in Birdwatching magazine, showcasing David Lindo visiting a wide variety of cities in Britain and Europe and the birds he has encountered on these short city breaks. These articles are collected here for the first time--most of them expanded with new material but also, featuring a few never before published. They cover visits to many cities throughout the world and the striking variations among them.

This book is not a compendium of birding sites within many of the world's cities. It is a series of adventures featuring birds and inspiring stories. Above all, it is hoped that this book will inspire you to look at cities with different eyes, to appreciate the diversity of wildlife wherever you are, and realize the importance of the conservation message.

Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City
Bird on Fire
Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City
Paperback      ISBN: 0199975523

Phoenix, Arizona is one of America's fastest growing metropolitan regions. It is also its least sustainable one, sprawling over a thousand square miles, with a population of four and a half million, minimal rainfall, scorching heat, and an insatiable appetite for unrestrained growth and unrestricted property rights.
In Bird on Fire, eminent social and cultural analyst Andrew Ross focuses on the prospects for sustainability in Phoenix--a city in the bull's eye of global warming--and also the obstacles that stand in the way. Most authors writing on sustainable cities look at places that have excellent public transit systems and relatively high density, such as Portland, Seattle, or New York. But Ross contends that if we can't change the game in fast-growing, low-density cities like Phoenix, the whole movement has a major problem. Drawing on interviews with 200 influential residents--from state legislators, urban planners, developers, and green business advocates to civil rights champions, energy lobbyists, solar entrepreneurs, and community activists--Ross argues that if Phoenix is ever to become sustainable, it will occur more through political and social change than through technological fixes. Ross explains how Arizona's increasingly xenophobic immigration laws, science-denying legislature, and growth-at-all-costs business ethic have perpetuated social injustice and environmental degradation. But he also highlights the positive changes happening in Phoenix, in particular the Gila River Indian Community's successful struggle to win back its water rights, potentially shifting resources away from new housing developments to producing healthy local food for the people of the Phoenix Basin. Ross argues that this victory may serve as a new model for how green democracy can work, redressing the claims of those who have been aggrieved in a way that creates long-term benefits for all.
Bird on Fire offers a compelling take on one of the pressing issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability at a time when governments are dismally failing in their responsibility to address climate change.

The Botanical City
The Botanical City
Paperback      ISBN: 3868595198

Plant life is a subject frequently ignored in the context of urban theory, and the essays in The Botanical City offer a fresh perspective into new ecological forms that continue to emerge in cities across the world. Much like the unique adaptive strategies of city-native animals, urban plants often become distinctively intertwined with their cities' human infrastructure, and this book explores both the scientific approaches to understanding these new ecologies and attempts on the part of writers and artists to engage with urban flora. Edited by the British cultural geographers Matthew Gandy and Sandra Jasper (and in part the result of their research together at the University of Cambridge) the book comprises ecological reflections on city design, history, art and mapmaking, alongside philosophical excursions on the meaning of urban ecology in the Anthropocene. Case studies include Berlin, London and Lahore.

The Carbon Efficient City
The Carbon Efficient City
Hardcover      ISBN: 0295996994

The Carbon Efficient City shows how regional economies can be aligned with practices that drive carbon efficiency. It details ten strategies for reducing carbon emissions in our cities: standardized measurement, frameworks that support innovation, regulatory alignment, reducing consumption, reuse and restoration, focus on neighborhoods, providing spaces for nature, use of on-site life cycles for water and energy, coordination of regional transportation, and emphasis on solutions that delight people.

Although climate change is recognized as an urgent concern, local and national governments, nonprofits, and private interests often work at cross purposes in attempting to address it. The Carbon Efficient City's focus on concrete, achievable measures that can be implemented in a market economy gives it broad appeal to professionals and engaged citizens across the political spectrum.

Watch the book trailer: https: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg3h0-fhYyA

Cities: An Environmental History
Cities
An Environmental History
Paperback      ISBN: 1845117964

Cities are amongst our greatest creations. Yet, with cities now home to over half the world's population, there is increasing concern over their unchecked expansion and the detrimental effect this is having on the planet. This unfettered growth is affecting every ecosystem on Earth, from the deepest oceans to the highest mountains, as induced climate change and ever increasing demands upon the world's resources take effect. As the pace of urbanisation quickens, how can we make the world's cities more sustainable? Ian Douglas tells the story of cities. He shows why they exist, how they have evolved and the problems they have encountered, revealing how from the very beginning environmental management played a key role in urban life. He addresses specific problems, such as noise and air pollution, water supply and waste management, as well as the vulnerability of cities to hazards such as earthquakes and flooding. And he considers strategies to make cities more sustainable and help them adapt to climate change, such as waste recycling, energy conservation, dual water systems, sustainable housing, as well as initiatives to retrofit existing cities.
Written by an acknowledged international authority, this unique volume will be welcomed by students and specialists in environment, planning, geography, ecology and the built environment.

Cities of Love: Roadmap for Sustaining Future Cities
Cities of Love
Roadmap for Sustaining Future Cities
Hardcover      ISBN: 9813200146

Earth's environmental problems are far from being resolved. A large part of these are due to ever-growing cities. Despite more efforts made to improve cities, it has been difficult to change cities. One of the fundamental reasons is that people are not motivated to help change their cities. Apathy is now the number one obstacle to positive change. There is hope and Love is the antidote.What you love, you will sustain. Cities of Love aims to urge, persuade and provoke fellow residents of our earth to collectively shape the cities we live in. To achieve this, her residents must again uncover the reasons to love and therefore sustain her cities. To this end, Cities of Love tries to identify the ingredients that could possibly be the reasons for such active love. When a city is filled by the people who love their cities, then can a city have a greater chance of advancing towards a better tomorrow. Love is a mighty force to be reckoned with.

Cities of Love: Roadmap for Sustaining Future Cities
Cities of Love
Roadmap for Sustaining Future Cities
Paperback      ISBN: 9813200154

Earth's environmental problems are far from being resolved. A large part of these are due to ever-growing cities. Despite more efforts made to improve cities, it has been difficult to change cities. One of the fundamental reasons is that people are not motivated to help change their cities. Apathy is now the number one obstacle to positive change. There is hope and Love is the antidote.What you love, you will sustain. Cities of Love aims to urge, persuade and provoke fellow residents of our earth to collectively shape the cities we live in. To achieve this, her residents must again uncover the reasons to love and therefore sustain her cities. To this end, Cities of Love tries to identify the ingredients that could possibly be the reasons for such active love. When a city is filled by the people who love their cities, then can a city have a greater chance of advancing towards a better tomorrow. Love is a mighty force to be reckoned with.

The City Is More Than Human: An Animal History of Seattle
The City Is More Than Human
An Animal History of Seattle
Hardcover      ISBN: 0295999349

Winner of the 2017 Virginia Marie Folkins Award, Association of King County Historical Organizations (AKCHO)
Winner of the 2017 Hal K. Rothman Book Prize, Western History Association

Seattle would not exist without animals. Animals have played a vital role in shaping the city from its founding amid existing indigenous towns in the mid-nineteenth century to the livestock-friendly town of the late nineteenth century to the pet-friendly, livestock-averse modern city.

When newcomers first arrived in the 1850s, they hastened to assemble the familiar cohort of cattle, horses, pigs, chickens, and other animals that defined European agriculture. This, in turn, contributed to the dispossession of the Native residents of the area. However, just as various animals were used to create a Euro-American city, the elimination of these same animals from Seattle was key to the creation of the new middle-class neighborhoods of the twentieth century. As dogs and cats came to symbolize home and family, Seattleites' relationship with livestock became distant and exploitative, demonstrating the deep social contradictions that characterize the modern American metropolis.

Throughout Seattle's history, people have sorted animals into categories and into places as a way of asserting power over animals, other people, and property. In The City Is More Than Human, Frederick Brown explores the dynamic, troubled relationship humans have with animals. In so doing he challenges us to acknowledge the role of animals of all sorts in the making and remaking of cities.