Climatology
Weather: An Illustrated History: From Cloud Atlases to Climate Change
Weather: An Illustrated History
From Cloud Atlases to Climate Change
Hardcover      ISBN: 1454921404
"Beautifully illustrated . . . Think of this book like dining on tapas, boasting savory flavors, some unexpected, that constitute a satisfying whole." --Washington Post

Andrew Revkin, strategic adviser for environmental and science journalism at the National Geographic Society and former senior climate reporter at ProPublica, presents an intriguing illustrated history of humanity's evolving relationship with Earth's dynamic climate system and the wondrous weather it generates.

Colorful and captivating, Weather: An Illustrated History hopscotches through 100 meteorological milestones and insights, from prehistory to today's headlines and tomorrow's forecasts. Bite-sized narratives, accompanied by exciting illustrations, touch on such varied topics as Earth's first atmosphere, the physics of rainbows, the deadliest hailstorm, Groundhog Day, the invention of air conditioning, London's Great Smog, the Year Without Summer, our increasingly strong hurricanes, and the Paris Agreement on climate change. Written by a prominent and award-winning environmental author and journalist, this is a groundbreaking illustrated book that traces the evolution of weather forecasting and climate science.
What Future: The Year's Best Ideas to Reclaim, Reanimate & Reinvent Our Future
What Future
The Year's Best Ideas to Reclaim, Reanimate & Reinvent Our Future
Paperback      ISBN: 1944700455
One of The Smithsonian Magazine's Best Science Books of the Year
The future is here and, frankly, it sucks. Without doubt, our culture is at a crossroads. Political strife and economic crises are byproducts of a larger looming challenge, one in which we will have to ask ourselves what constitutes a meaningful life. We must do the hard work of imagining a different kind of reality for ourselves. It's work that anticipates the worst but sees hope on the other side of catastrophe, or at least possibility; that presumes disaster and says, now what? A best-of-the-year anthology, What Future is a collection of long-form journalism and essays published in 2016 that address a wide range of topics crucial to our future, from the environmental and political, to human health and animal rights, to technology and the economy. What Future includes writing from authors Elizabeth Kolbert, Jeff Vandermeer, Bill McKibben, Kim Stanley Robinson, as well as the scientists, journalists, and philosophers who are proposing the options that lay not just ahead, but beyond, in prestigious magazines and journals such as The Atlantic and The New Yorker.
Why the Wind Blows: A History of Weather and Global Warming
Why the Wind Blows
A History of Weather and Global Warming
Paperback      ISBN: 0942679318

In easily understandable prose and through use of true stories of exploration, Why the Wind Blows looks at how these adventures were influenced by weather and man's ignorance of its consequences. The science of meteorology is gently interspersed throughout the text, so that understanding weather becomes an integral part of the stories. Concluding with the influence of modern civilization on the changing climate and its world-altering consequences, the author challenges the reader to take action now to alter the effects of global warming on future generations.

Wisconsin's Weather and Climate
Wisconsin's Weather and Climate
Paperback      ISBN: 0299171841

The land that is now called Wisconsin has a place in weather history. Its climate has ranged from tropical to polar over hundreds of millions of years and even today, that s the seeming difference between July and January here. And Wisconsinites have played key roles in advancing the science of meterology and climatology: Increase Lapham helped found the National Weather Service in the nineteenth century; Eric Miller was the first to broadcast regular weather reports on the radio in the 1920s; Verner Suomi pioneered tracking weather by satellite; and Reid Bryson has been a leader in studying global climate change.
Wisconsin's Weather and Climate is written for weather buffs, teachers, students, outdoor enthusiasts, and those working in fields, lakes, and forests for whom the weather is a daily force to be reckoned with. It examines the physical features of Wisconsin that shape the state s climate topography, mid-latitude location, and proximity to Lakes Superior and Michigan and meteorological phenomena that affect climate, such as atmospheric circulation and air mass frequency. Authors Joseph M. Moran and Edward J. Hopkins trace the evolution of methods of weather observation and forecasting that are so important for agriculture and Great Lakes commerce, and they explain how Wisconsin scientists use weather balloons, radar, and satellites to improve forecasting and track climate changes. They take readers through the seasonal changes in weather in Wisconsin and give an overview of what past climate changes might tell us about the future.
Appendices provide climatic data for Wisconsin, including extremes of temperature, snowfall, and precipitation at selected stations in the state. The authors also list sources for further information.
Vignettes throughout the book provide fascinating weather lore:
o Why there are cacti in Wisconsin
o The famous Green Bay Packers Dallas Cowboys "Ice Bowl" game of 1967
o The Army Signal Corps ban on the word tornado
o Advances in snow-making technology
o The decline of the Great Lakes ice industry
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The Year Without Summer: 1816 and the Volcano That Darkened the World and Changed History
The Year Without Summer
1816 and the Volcano That Darkened the World and Changed History
Paperback      ISBN: 1250042755

Like Winchester's Krakatoa, The Year Without Summer reveals a year of dramatic global change long forgotten by history

In the tradition of Krakatoa, The World Without Us, and Guns, Germs and Steel comes a sweeping history of the year that became known as 18-hundred-and-froze-to-death. 1816 was a remarkable year--mostly for the fact that there was no summer. As a result of a volcanic eruption at Mount Tambora in Indonesia, weather patterns were disrupted worldwide for months, allowing for excessive rain, frost, and snowfall through much of the Northeastern U.S. and Europe in the summer of 1816.

In the U.S., the extraordinary weather produced food shortages, religious revivals, and extensive migration from New England to the Midwest. In Europe, the cold and wet summer led to famine, food riots, the transformation of stable communities into wandering beggars, and one of the worst typhus epidemics in history. 1816 was the year Frankenstein was written. It was also the year Turner painted his fiery sunsets. All of these things are linked to global climate change--something we are quite aware of now, but that was utterly mysterious to people in the nineteenth century, who concocted all sorts of reasons for such an ungenial season.

Making use of a wealth of source material and employing a compelling narrative approach featuring peasants and royalty, politicians, writers, and scientists, The Year Without Summer by William K. Klingaman and Nicholas P. Klingaman examines not only the climate change engendered by the volcano, but also its effects on politics, the economy, the arts, and social structures.