U.s. - Political and Civil Rights of Blacks
William Henry Jernagin in Washington, D.C.: Faith in the Fight for Civil Rights
William Henry Jernagin in Washington, D.C.
Faith in the Fight for Civil Rights
Paperback      ISBN: 1467119113
William Henry Jernagin was a devout Christian and fierce advocate for civil rights in the first half of the twentieth century. He was senior pastor of the Mount Carmel Baptist Church in the Mount Vernon Square neighborhood for more than forty-five years. His activism made him an internationally recognized figure. He was a foundational leader in the American civil rights movement. His residency allowed him to contribute to the collective action to abolish Jim Crow in the nation's capital. Through his office in the National Baptist Convention, he also identified the potential in a lesser-known leader of the time, Martin Luther King Jr. Jernagin's passion lifted him to leading positions in the National Baptist Convention and National Fraternal Council of Negro Churches, as well as close work with Presidents Roosevelt, Truman and Eisenhower. Author Ida E. Jones reveals the story of this often-overlooked leader and his fight for civil rights while living in the District of Columbia.
Within the Veil: Black Journalists, White Media
Within the Veil
Black Journalists, White Media
Hardcover      ISBN: 0814757995
Within the Veil: Black Journalists, White Media
Within the Veil
Black Journalists, White Media
Paperback      ISBN: 0814758002
Winner of the National Press Club Prize for Media Criticism. Companion website: http://www.nyupress.nyu.edu/authors/veil.html Thirty years ago, the Kerner Commission Report made national headlines by exposing the consistently biased coverage afforded African Americans in the mainstream media. While the report acted as a much ballyhooed wake-up call, the problems it identified have stubbornly persisted, despite the infusion of black and other racial minority journalists into the newsroom. In Within the Veil, Pamela Newkirk unmasks the ways in which race continues to influence reportage, both overtly and covertly. Newkirk charts a series of race-related conflicts at news organizations across the country, illustrating how African American journalists have influenced and been denied influence to the content, presentation, and very nature of news. Through anecdotes culled from interviews with over 100 broadcast and print journalists, Newkirk exposes the trials and triumphs of African American journalists as they struggle in pursuit of more equitable coverage of racial minorities. She illuminates the agonizing dilemmas they face when writing stories critical of blacks, stories which force them to choose between journalistic integrity, their own advancement, and the almost certain enmity of the black community. Within the Veil is a gripping front-line report on the continuing battle to integrate America's newsrooms and news coverage.
Without Justice for All: The New Liberalism and Our Retreat from Racial Equality
Without Justice for All
The New Liberalism and Our Retreat from Racial Equality
Paperback      ISBN: 0813320518
A new critique of public policy in the U.S. regarding race reveals how the nation's political and policy-making elite came to abandon notions of egalitarianism and the role of institutional racism to embrace the idea that minorities are responsible for their lot in life.
Witness in Philadelphia
Witness in Philadelphia
Paperback      ISBN: 0807115665
The account of the author's life during the three and a half years following the killing of three civil-rights workers in Mississippi
Women in the Civil Rights Movement: Trailblazers and Torchbearers, 1941-1965
Women in the Civil Rights Movement
Trailblazers and Torchbearers, 1941-1965
Paperback      ISBN: 0253208327
"?[Women in the Civil Rights Movement] helps break the gender line that restricted women in civil rights history to background and backstage roles, and places them in front, behind, and in the middle of the Southern movement that re-made America.... It is an invaluable resource which helps set history straight."
Yankee Stepfather: General O.O. Howard and the Freedmen
Yankee Stepfather
General O.O. Howard and the Freedmen
Paperback      ISBN: 0393311783
The story of a Civil War promise made to slaves--and broken. At the close of the Civil War, Congress established the Freedmen's Bureau--formally, the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands--to deal with the question of the place in society of its new black citizens. General Oliver Otis Howard, known both admiringly and derisively as the "Christian General," was given the responsibility of defining the nation's committment to four million former slaves. Instructed by Congress to divide lands abandoned to the Union army into forty-acre plots and award them to freedmen, Howard began a program that might have given many families farms of their own. The effort had barely begun when it ran into President Andrew Johnson's policy of returning such lands to former white owners. Soon Howard and his agents were under pressure not to assit the free people, but to coerce them into working for landlords. And yet, however tarnished the record, the Bureau was still recalled by W. E. B. DuBois for its "bright promise." Yankee Stepfather provides a revealing, and troubling, picture of the complex relationship of African Americans to their government at a crucial juncture in American history. In a new foreword to this edition, William S. McFeely places his book, first published in 1968, in its place in th scholarship on race relations of the past quarter-century.
You Can't Eat Freedom: Southerners and Social Justice After the Civil Rights Movement
You Can't Eat Freedom
Southerners and Social Justice After the Civil Rights Movement
1st Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 1469629305
Two revolutions roiled the rural South after the mid-1960s: the political revolution wrought by the passage of civil rights legislation, and the ongoing economic revolution brought about by increasing agricultural mechanization. Political empowerment for black southerners coincided with the transformation of southern agriculture and the displacement of thousands of former sharecroppers from the land. Focusing on the plantation regions of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, Greta de Jong analyzes how social justice activists responded to mass unemployment by lobbying political leaders, initiating antipoverty projects, and forming cooperative enterprises that fostered economic and political autonomy, efforts that encountered strong opposition from free market proponents who opposed government action to solve the crisis. Making clear the relationship between the civil rights movement and the War on Poverty, this history of rural organizing shows how responses to labor displacement in the South shaped the experiences of other Americans who were affected by mass layoffs in the late twentieth century, shedding light on a debate that continues to reverberate today.
You Can’t Eat Freedom: Southerners and Social Justice After the Civil Rights Movement
You Can’t Eat Freedom
Southerners and Social Justice After the Civil Rights Movement
Paperback      ISBN: 1469654792
Two revolutions roiled the rural South after the mid-1960s: the political revolution wrought by the passage of civil rights legislation, and the ongoing economic revolution brought about by increasing agricultural mechanization. Political empowerment for black southerners coincided with the transformation of southern agriculture and the displacement of thousands of former sharecroppers from the land. Focusing on the plantation regions of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, Greta de Jong analyzes how social justice activists responded to mass unemployment by lobbying political leaders, initiating antipoverty projects, and forming cooperative enterprises that fostered economic and political autonomy, efforts that encountered strong opposition from free market proponents who opposed government action to solve the crisis. Making clear the relationship between the civil rights movement and the War on Poverty, this history of rural organizing shows how responses to labor displacement in the South shaped the experiences of other Americans who were affected by mass layoffs in the late twentieth century, shedding light on a debate that continues to reverberate today.