U.s. - Political and Civil Rights of Blacks
I Have a Dream: Writings and Speeches That Changed the World
I Have a Dream
Writings and Speeches That Changed the World
1st Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0062505521
Gathers speeches, sermons, letters, and essays from each period in Dr. King's life, and includes brief notes on their historical background
Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63
Parting the Waters
America in the King Years, 1954-63
Paperback      ISBN: 0671687425
Traces the birth of the American civil rights movement and profiles Martin Luther King, Jr., detailing the roles played by key figures around him and in government
A Spy in Canaan: How the FBI Used a Famous Photographer to Infiltrate the Civil Rights Movement
A Spy in Canaan
How the FBI Used a Famous Photographer to Infiltrate the Civil Rights Movement
Hardcover      ISBN: 1612193412
The story of the double life of famed civil rights photographer Ernest Withers--and how a closely guarded government secret finally came to light. Told by the journalist who broke the story. Ernest Withers captured some of the most iconic moments of the civil rights movement--from the rare photo of Martin Luther King Jr. in repose to the haunting photo of Emmet Till's great-uncle pointing an accusing finger at Till's killers. He was trusted and beloved by King's inner circle, and had a front row seat to history. But what most people don't know is that Withers was an informant for the FBI--and his photos helped the bureau identify and surveil the era's greatest figures. This book explores the life, complex motivations, and legacy of this fascinating figure.
A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.
A Testament of Hope
The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Paperback      ISBN: 0060646918
Collects the civil rights leader's writings on nonviolence, social policy, integration, black nationalism, and more
They Can't Kill Us All: The Story of the Struggle for Black Lives
They Can't Kill Us All
The Story of the Struggle for Black Lives
Paperback      ISBN: 0316312495
"Electric...so well reported, so plainly told and so evidently the work of a man who has not grown a callus on his heart."--Dwight Garner, New York Times, "A Top Ten Book of 2016" "I'd recommend everyone to read this book because it's not just statistics, it's not just the information, but it's the connective tissue that shows the human story behind it." -- Trevor Noah, The Daily Show New York Times Editors' Choice One of the Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016 -- Publishers Weekly One of the Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016 -- Elle 11 Fall Books We Can't Wait to Read -- Seattle Times A best book of fall 2016 -- Boston Globe One of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch's 20 Books to Watch, fall 2016 One of Vulture's "7 Books You Need to Read this November" A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today. In an effort to grasp the magnitude of the repose to Michael Brown's death and understand the scale of the problem police violence represents, Lowery speaks to Brown's family and the families of other victims other victims' families as well as local activists. By posing the question, "What does the loss of any one life mean to the rest of the nation?" Lowery examines the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs. Studded with moments of joy, and tragedy, They Can't Kill Us All offers a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, showing that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. As Lowery brings vividly to life, the protests against police killings are also about the black community's long history on the receiving end of perceived and actual acts of injustice and discrimination. They Can't Kill Us All grapples with a persistent if also largely unexamined aspect of the otherwise transformative presidency of Barack Obama: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to those Americans most in need of both.
We Can't Breathe: On Black Lives, White Lies, and the Art of Survival
We Can't Breathe
On Black Lives, White Lies, and the Art of Survival
Paperback      ISBN: 1250174538
A critically acclaimed writer presents eight wide-ranging and powerful essays that tell the story of black survival and persistence through art and community in the face of centuries of racism. Original.
What Happened, Miss Simone?: A Biography
What Happened, Miss Simone?
A Biography
Hardcover      ISBN: 1101904879
"Inspired by the critically acclaimed Netflix documentary What Happened, Miss Simone?, an intimate and vivid look at the legendary life of Nina Simone, the classically trained pianist who evolved into a chart-topping chanteuse and committed civil rights activist. From music journalist and former Spin and Vibe editor-in-chief Alan Light comes a biography of incandescent soul singer and Black Power icon Nina Simone, one of the most influential, provocative, and least understood artists of our time. Drawn from a trove of rare archival footage, audio recordings and interviews (including Simone's remarkable private diaries), this nuanced examination of Nina Simone's life highlights her musical inventiveness and unwavering quest for equality, while laying bare the personal demons that plagued her from the time of her Jim Crow childhood in North Carolina to her self-imposed exile in Liberia and Paris later in life. Harnessing the singular voice of Miss Simone herself and incorporating candid reflections from those who knew her best, including her only daughter, Light brings us face to face with a legend, examining the very public persona and very private struggles of one of our greatest artists"--
What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America
What Truth Sounds Like
Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America
Hardcover      ISBN: 1250199417
A stunning follow up to New York Times bestseller Tears We Cannot Stop, a timely exploration of America's tortured racial politics President Barack Obama: "Everybody who speaks after Michael Eric Dyson pales in comparison.
When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America
When and Where I Enter
The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0688146503
Drawing on extensive research in speeches, diaries, letters, and other original sources, this interpretive history assesses the contributions of numerous uncelebrated Black women to the causes of political and sexual equality. Reissue.
The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era
The Original Black Elite
Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era
Hardcover      ISBN: 0062346091
In this outstanding cultural biography, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Slave in the White House chronicles a critical yet overlooked chapter in American history: the inspiring rise and calculated fall of the black elite, from Emancipation through Reconstruction to the Jim Crow Era—embodied in the experiences of an influential figure of the time, academic, entrepreneur, and political activist and black history pioneer Daniel Murray. In the wake of the Civil War, Daniel Murray, born free and educated in Baltimore, was in the vanguard of Washington, D.C.’s black upper class. Appointed Assistant Librarian at the Library of Congress—at a time when government appointments were the most prestigious positions available for blacks—Murray became wealthy through his business as a construction contractor and married a college-educated socialite. The Murrays’ social circles included some of the first African-American U.S. Senators and Congressmen, and their children went to the best colleges—Harvard and Cornell. Though Murray and other black elite of his time were primed to assimilate into the cultural fabric as Americans first and people of color second, their prospects were crushed by Jim Crow segregation and the capitulation to white supremacist groups by the government, which turned a blind eye to their unlawful—often murderous—acts. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor traces the rise, fall, and disillusionment of upper-class African Americans, revealing that they were a representation not of hypothetical achievement but what could be realized by African Americans through education and equal opportunities. As she makes clear, these well-educated and wealthy elite were living proof that African Americans did not lack ability to fully participate in the social contract as white supremacists claimed, making their subsequent fall when Reconstruction was prematurely abandoned all the more tragic. Illuminating and powerful, her magnificent work brings to life a dark chapter of American history that too many Americans have yet to recognize.