U.s. - Political and Civil Rights of Women
At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance--A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Pow
At the Dark End of the Street
Black Women, Rape, and Resistance--A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Pow
Paperback      ISBN: 0307389243
Groundbreaking, controversial, and courageous, here is the story of Rosa Parks and Recy Taylor--a story that reinterprets the history of America's civil rights movement in terms of the sexual violence committed against black women by white men.

Rosa Parks was often described as a sweet and reticent elderly woman whose tired feet caused her to defy segregation on Montgomery's city buses, and whose supposedly solitary, spontaneous act sparked the 1955 bus boycott that gave birth to the civil rights movement. The truth of who Rosa Parks was and what really lay beneath the 1955 boycott is far different from anything previously written.

In this groundbreaking and important book, Danielle McGuire writes about the rape in 1944 of a twenty-four-year-old mother and sharecropper, Recy Taylor, who strolled toward home after an evening of singing and praying at the Rock Hill Holiness Church in Abbeville, Alabama. Seven white men, armed with knives and shotguns, ordered the young woman into their green Chevrolet, raped her, and left her for dead. The president of the local NAACP branch office sent his best investigator and organizer--Rosa Parks--to Abbeville. In taking on this case, Parks launched a movement that exposed a ritualized history of sexual assault against black women and added fire to the growing call for change.

When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America
When and Where I Enter
The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0688146503

When and Where I Enter is an eloquent testimonial to the profound influence of African-American women on race and women's movements throughout American history. Drawing on speeches, diaries, letters, and other original documents, Paula Giddings powerfully portrays how black women have transcended racist and sexist attitudes--often confronting white feminists and black male leaders alike--to initiate social and political reform. From the open disregard for the rights of slave women to examples of today's more covert racism and sexism in civil rights and women'sorganizations, Giddings illuminates the black woman's crusade for equality. In the process, she paints unforgettable portraits of black female leaders, such as anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells, educator and FDR adviser Mary McLeod Bethune, and the heroic civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, among others, who fought both overt and institutionalized oppression.

When and Where I Enter reveals the immense moral power black women possessed and sought to wield throughout their history--the same power that prompted Anna Julia Cooper in 1892 to tell a group of black clergymen, "Only the black woman can say 'when and where I enter, in the quiet, undisputed dignity of my womanhood, without violence and without suing or special patronage, then and there the whole . . . race enters with me.'"

The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison
The Trials of Nina McCall
Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison "promiscuous" Women
Paperback      ISBN: 0807021857
The nearly forgotten story of the American Plan, a government program to regulate women's bodies and sexuality--and how they fought back--told through the lens of one of its survivors

"A consistently surprising page-turner . . . a brilliant study of the way social anxieties have historically congealed in state control over women's bodies and behavior."--New York Times Book Review

Nina McCall was one of many women unfairly imprisoned by the United States government throughout the twentieth century. Tens, probably hundreds, of thousands of women and girls were locked up--usually without due process--simply because officials suspected these women were prostitutes, carrying STIs, or just "promiscuous."

This discriminatory program, dubbed the "American Plan," lasted from the 1910s into the 1950s, implicating a number of luminaries, including Eleanor Roosevelt, John D. Rockefeller Jr., Earl Warren, and even Eliot Ness, while laying the foundation for the modern system of women's prisons. In some places, vestiges of the Plan lingered into the 1960s and 1970s, and the laws that undergirded it remain on the books to this day.

Nina McCall's story provides crucial insight into the lives of countless other women incarcerated under the American Plan. Stern demonstrates the pain and shame felt by these women and details the multitude of mortifications they endured, both during and after their internment. Yet thousands of incarcerated women rioted, fought back against their oppressors, or burned their detention facilities to the ground; they jumped out of windows or leapt from moving trains or scaled barbed-wire fences in order to escape. And, as Nina McCall did, they sued their captors. In an age of renewed activism surrounding harassment, health care, prisons, women's rights, and the power of the state, this virtually lost chapter of our history is vital reading.
Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America
Bananeras
Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America
Paperback      ISBN: 1608465357

" Bananeras] is a vital accounting of the struggles still being waged."--Margaret Randall, author of When I Look Into the Mirror and See You: Women, Terror, and Resistance

Women banana workers have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and their lives. Highly accessible and narrative in style, Bananeras recounts the history and growth of this vital movement and shows how Latin American woman workers are shaping and broadly reimagining the possibilities of international labor solidarity.

Dana Frank is a professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author of the award-winning Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.

Keep Marching: How Every Woman Can Take Action and Change Our World
Keep Marching
How Every Woman Can Take Action and Change Our World
Paperback      ISBN: 0316515566
A GROUNDBREAKING, DEFINITIVE WORK ON HOW TO BUILD WOMEN'S POWER

"A perfect primer for women everywhere who want to take action-whether their heading to their first town hall meeting or running for office."
-Cecile Richards, New York Times bestselling author of Make Trouble and President of Planned Parenthood

"The book we all need to remind us why the fight against white supremacy and patriarchy will actually set us free."
-Patrisse Khan-Cullors, cofounder of Black Lives Matter and New York Times bestselling author of When They Call You a Terrorist

Keep Marching is a practical guide and highly researched examination of the barriers that hold women back-and how to overcome them.
Author Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner--the executive director of MomsRising, and a keynote speaker at the 2017 Women's March in Washington, D.C.--presents compelling data, timeless action plans, thought-provoking stories, a proactive agenda for change,
and inspiration for how women can create change in their everyday lives and in the country as a whole.
This book provides proven tactics, policy solutions, and strategies any woman can use to build her power.

DID YOU KNOW THAT:
  • One in three women have experienced some form of sexual assault?
  • When a group includes more women, its collective intelligence rises?
  • The U.S. doesn't have paid family/medical leave but 177 other countries do?
Keep Marching calls on all badass women for justice to come together and rise.
Alice Paul: Equality for Women
Alice Paul
Equality for Women
Paperback      ISBN: 0813347610

Alice Paul: Equality for Women shows the dominant and unwavering role Paul played in the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, granting the vote to American women. The dramatic details of Paul's imprisonment and solitary confinement, hunger strike, and force-feeding at the hands of the U.S. government illustrate her fierce devotion to the cause she spent her life promoting. Placed in the context of the first half of the twentieth century, Paul's story also touches on issues of progressivism and labor reform, race and class, World War I patriotism and America's emerging role as a global power, women's activism in the political sphere, and the global struggle for women's rights.

About the Lives of American Women series: Selected and edited by renowned women's historian Carol Berkin, these brief biographies are designed for use in undergraduate courses. Rather than a comprehensive approach, each biography focuses instead on a particular aspect of a women's life that is emblematic of her time, or which made her a pivotal figure in the era. The emphasis is on a "good read," featuring accessible writing and compelling narratives, without sacrificing sound scholarship and academic integrity. Primary sources at the end of each biography reveal the subject's perspective in her own words. Study questions and an annotated bibliography support the student reader.

The American Life of Ernestine L. Rose
The American Life of Ernestine L. Rose
Hardcover      ISBN: 0815605285

A biography of Ernestine L. Rose, a women's rights activist in 19th-century America. It covers her atheism, her Jewish and Polish background, her foreign accent, and her blunt appeal to reason. This volume includes some of the speeches and letters of the movement.

American Women and Political Participation: The Impacts of Work, Generation, and Feminism
American Women and Political Participation
The Impacts of Work, Generation, and Feminism
Hardcover      ISBN: 031324507x

Karen Beckwith examines the patterns of mass-level political participation among American women from 1952 to 1976. Four distinct forms of political participation are focused upon: voting, electoral activism, conventional nonelectoral participation, and political protest. She then tests three explanations considered unique to the political participation of women in these areas: the nature of women's work; women's experience in political generations; and adherence to or support of feminism. Surprisingly, Beckwith's study indicates that such traditional explanations reveal more about men than about women, and that there is very little difference in participation between the sexes. However, Beckwith found that reported feelings of political efficacy among women were less than among men, even where actual participation differences were nonexistent.

At Women's Expense: State Power and the Politics of Fetal Rights
At Women's Expense
State Power and the Politics of Fetal Rights
Paperback      ISBN: 0674050444

Some say the fetus is the "tiniest citizen." If so, then the bodies of women themselves have become political arenas--or, recent cases suggest, battlefields. A cocaine-addicted mother is convicted of drug trafficking through the umbilical cord. Women employees at a battery plant must prove infertility to keep their jobs. A terminally ill woman is forced to undergo a cesarean section. No longer concerned with conception or motherhood, the new politics of fetal rights focuses on fertility and pregnancy itself, on a woman's relationship with the fetus. How exactly, Cynthia Daniels asks, does this affect a woman's rights? Are they different from a man's? And how has the state helped determine the difference? The answers, rigorously pursued throughout this book, give us a clear look into the state's paradoxical role in gender politics--as both a challenger of injustice and an agent of social control.

In benchmark legal cases concerned with forced medical treatment, fetal protectionism in the workplace, and drug and alcohol use and abuse, Daniels shows us state power at work in the struggle between fetal rights and women's rights. These cases raise critical questions about the impact of gender on women's standing as citizens, and about the relationship between state power and gender inequality. Fully appreciating the difficulties of each case, the author probes the subtleties of various positions and their implications for a deeper understanding of how a woman's reproductive capability affects her relationship to state power. In her analysis, the need to defend women's right to self-sovereignty becomes clear, but so does the need to define further the very concepts of self-sovereignty and privacy.

The intensity of the debate over fetal rights suggests the depth of the current gender crisis and the force of the feelings of social dislocation generated by reproductive politics. Breaking through the public mythology that clouds these debates, At Women's Expense makes a hopeful beginning toward liberating woman's body within the body politic.

Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President
Belva Lockwood
The Woman Who Would Be President
Paperback      ISBN: 0814758517

Foreword by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
In Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts, for the first time, the life story of one of the nineteenth century's most surprising and accomplished advocates for women's rights. As Norgren shows, Lockwood was fearless in confronting the male establishment, commanding the attention of presidents, members of Congress, influential writers, and everyday Americans. Obscured for too long in the historical shadow of her longtime colleague, Susan B. Anthony, Lockwood steps into the limelight at last in this engaging new biography.
Born on a farm in upstate New York in 1830, Lockwood married young and reluctantly became a farmer's wife. After her husband's premature death, however, she earned a college degree, became a teacher, and moved to Washington, DC with plans to become an attorney-an occupation all but closed to women. Not only did she become one of the first female attorneys in the U.S., but in 1879 became the first woman ever allowed to practice at the bar of the Supreme Court.
In 1884 Lockwood continued her trailblazing ways as the first woman to run a full campaign for the U.S. Presidency. She ran for President again in 1888. Although her candidacies were unsuccessful (as she knew they would be), Lockwood demonstrated that women could compete with men in the political arena. After these campaigns she worked tirelessly on behalf of the Universal Peace Union, hoping, until her death in 1917, that she, or the organization, would win the Nobel Peace Prize.
Belva Lockwood deserves to be far better known. As Norgren notes, it is likely that Lockwood would be widely recognized today as a feminist pioneer if most of her personal papers had not been destroyed after her death. Fortunately for readers, Norgren shares much of her subject's tenacity and she has ensured Lockwood's rightful place in history with this meticulously researched and beautifully written book.