Urban Planning
Limits of the City
Limits of the City
Paperback      ISBN: 0920057640
"City air makes people free." With this adage Murray Bookchin begins a remarkable essay on the evolution of urbanism. With a wealth of learning and a depth of passion, Bookchin convincingly argues that there was once a human and progressive tradition of urban life, and that this heritage has reached its "ultimate negation in the modern metropolis".
Magic Lands: Western Cityscapes and American Culture After 1940
Magic Lands
Western Cityscapes and American Culture After 1940
Hardcover      ISBN: 0520077032
The American West conjures up images of pastoral tranquility and wide open spaces, but by 1970 the Far West was the most urbanized section of the country. Exploring four intriguing cityscapes—Disneyland, Stanford Industrial Park, Sun City, and the 1962 Seattle World's Fair—John Findlay shows how each created a sense of cohesion and sustained people's belief in their superior urban environment. This first book-length study of the urban West after 1940 argues that Westerners deliberately tried to build cities that differed radically from their eastern counterparts. In 1954, Walt Disney began building the world's first theme park, using Hollywood's movie-making techniques. The creators of Stanford Industrial Park were more hesitant in their approach to a conceptually organized environment, but by the mid-1960s the Park was the nation's prototypical "research park" and the intellectual downtown for the high-technology region that became Silicon Valley. In 1960, on the outskirts of Phoenix, Del E. Webb built Sun City, the largest, most influential retirement community in the United States. Another innovative cityscape arose from the 1962 Seattle World's Fair and provided a futuristic, somewhat fanciful vision of modern life. These four became "magic lands" that provided an antidote to the apparent chaos of their respective urban milieus. Exemplars of a new lifestyle, they are landmarks on the changing cultural landscape of postwar America.
Minneapolis-St. Paul: People, Place, and Public Life
Minneapolis-St. Paul
People, Place, and Public Life
Hardcover      ISBN: 0816622361
The Twin Cities are an outstanding place to live, work, play, and participate in an active civic life. Lakes, extensive Parklands, natural preserves, and the urban forest play a large role in drawing people to the Twin Cities and keeping them here. Enhanced with maps, photographs, and graphs, Minneapolis-St. Paul is the most comprehensive, up-to-date book available on the metro area and its unique social, economic, political, and physical environment. This impressive and entertaining compilation of information will be useful for present and prospective residents of the Twin Cities, real-estate brokers and developers, local government officials, city planners, public-relations representatives, students of urban geography and sociology and land-use planners.
Urban Being: Anatomy & Identity of the City
Urban Being
Anatomy & Identity of the City
Paperback      ISBN: 3721209680
There is a long tradition of comparing cities with organisms as they have similarities in their anatomy. But since cities are brought into life by the presence of people, they are less living beings than urban beings with their own identity. This is based on the behaviors, needs and requirements of the residents. Certain city structures, wherever they are, are influenced in similar ways by the people who interact with them. This volume shows and makes understandable these influences on the living environments of the inhabitants. Through detailed charts and elaborate maps generated from satelite images various city structures are compared across five different dimensions and their influence on the city's identity through the lived experience of the inhabitants is discussed.
A-Z of Housing
A-Z of Housing
Paperback      ISBN: 1137366737
This book provides an accessible and up-to-date overview of the current debates and discussions in housing policy and practice. It acts as a source of reference for anyone studying or working in the housing field; from social policy studies to town planning.
Abulecentrism: Rapid Development of Society Catalyzed at the Local Community Level
Abulecentrism
Rapid Development of Society Catalyzed at the Local Community Level
Hardcover      ISBN: 3319010220
The book describes a development concept called abulecentrism. The Yoruba word abule (pronounced: a-boo-lay) literarily means “the village
Abulecentrism: Rapid Development of Society Catalyzed at the Local Community Level
Abulecentrism
Rapid Development of Society Catalyzed at the Local Community Level
Paperback      ISBN: 3319344374
Africa's Urban Revolution
Africa's Urban Revolution
Paperback      ISBN: 1780325207
The facts of Africa's rapid urbanisation are startling. By 2030 African cities will have grown by more than 350 million people and the continent will have surpassed the 50% urban mark. Yet, in the minds of policy makers, scholars and much of the general public, Africa remains a quintessential rural place. This lack of awareness and robust analysis means it is difficult to make a policy case for a more overtly 'urban agenda'. As a result, there is, across the continent, insufficient urgency directed to responding to the challenges and opportunities associated with the world's last major wave of urbanisation. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and practitioners associated with the African Centre for Cities, and utilising a diverse array of case studies, the book provides comprehensive insight into the key issues - demographic, cultural, political, technical, environmental and economic - surrounding African urbanization.

After Sustainable Cities?
After Sustainable Cities?
Hardcover      ISBN: 0415659868
After Sustainable Cities?
After Sustainable Cities?
Paperback      ISBN: 0415659876
A sustainable city has been defined in many ways. Yet the most frequently quoted understanding is from Our Common Future in 1987. This is a vision of the city that is able to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Two ideas were central to this vision – cities should meet social needs – especially of the poor and not exceed the ability of the global environment to meet needs. After Sustainable Cities critically examines what has happened to these priorities and asks whether these social commitments have been abandoned in a period of austerity governance and climate change and replaced by a darker and unfair city. After Sustainable Cities provides a critical review of what has happened to sustainable cities. The dominant discourse on sustainable cities with a commitment to intergenerational equity, social justice and global responsibility has come under increasing pressure but it is not clear what is replacing this logic. Under conditions of global ecological change, international financial and economic crisis and austerity governance new eco-logics are entering the urban sustainability lexicon – climate change, green growth, smart growth, resilience and vulnerability, ecological security etc. Yet it is not clear to researchers or policymakers how these new – more technologically and economically driven - themes resonate and dissonate with conventional sustainable cities discourse. How do these new eco-logics reshape our understanding of equity, justice and global responsibility? After Sustainable Cities provides the reader with the first comprehensive, critical and comparative analysis of the new eco-logics reshaping conventional sustainable cities discourse. It brings together leading researchers on smart cities, green growth, resource flows, vulnerability and resilience, ecological security and climate change who critically examine how these new eco-logics are reshaping the environmental priorities of cities in both the global north and south. Each chapter carefully considers what these new logics do to the original precepts of sustainable cities and identify what sort of city is now emerging. After Sustainable Cities provides a warning that a much darker more technological driven and narrowly constructed economic agenda is driving ecological policy and weakening previous commitment to social justice and equity.