Urban Planning
How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood
How to Kill a City
Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood
Paperback      ISBN: 1568589034
A journey to the front lines of the battle for the future of American cities, uncovering the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification--and the lives that are altered in the process. The term gentrification has become a buzzword to describe the changes in urban neighborhoods across the country, but we don't realize just how threatening it is. It means more than the arrival of trendy shops, much-maligned hipsters, and expensive lattes. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance. Peter Moskowitz's How to Kill a City takes readers from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised. Along the way, Moskowitz uncovers the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification in New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, and New York. The deceptively simple question of who can and cannot afford to pay the rent goes to the heart of America's crises of race and inequality. In the fight for economic opportunity and racial justice, nothing could be more important than housing. A vigorous, hard-hitting expose, How to Kill a City reveals who holds power in our cities-and how we can get it back
The Death and Life of Great American Cities
The Death and Life of Great American Cities
Paperback      ISBN: 067974195x
Penetrating analysis of the functions and organization of city neighborhoods, the forces of deterioration and regeneration, and the necessary planning innovations
Eyes on the Street: The Life of Jane Jacobs
Eyes on the Street
The Life of Jane Jacobs
Paperback      ISBN: 0345803337
The first major biography of the irrepressible woman who changed the way we view and live in cities, and whose influence can still be felt in any discussion of urban planning to this day. Eyes on the Street is a revelation of the phenomenal woman who raised three children, wrote seven groundbreaking books, saved neighborhoods, stopped expressways, was arrested twice, and engaged at home and on the streets in thousands of debates--all of which she won. Here is the child who challenged her third-grade teacher; the high school poet; the journalist who honed her writing skills at Iron Age, Architectural Forum, Fortune, and other outlets, while amassing the knowledge she would draw upon to write her most famous book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Here, too, is the activist who helped lead an ultimately successful protest against Robert Moses's proposed expressway through her beloved Greenwich Village; and who, in order to keep her sons out of the Vietnam War, moved to Canada, where she became as well known and admired as she was in the United States. From the Hardcover edition.
Limits of the City
Limits of the City
Paperback      ISBN: 0920057640
"City air makes people free." With this adage Murray Bookchin begins a remarkable essay on the evolution of urbanism. With a wealth of learning and a depth of passion, Bookchin convincingly argues that there was once a human and progressive tradition of urban life, and that this heritage has reached its "ultimate negation in the modern metropolis".
How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood
How to Kill a City
Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood
Hardcover      ISBN: 1568585233
While the mainstream media publishes style pieces about mustached hipsters brewing craft beers in warehouses in Brooklyn, global businessmen are remaking entire cities. While new coffee shops open for business in previously affordable neighborhoods, residents ignore the multi-million-dollar tax giveaways that have enabled real estate developers to build skyscrapers on top of brownstones. As journalist Peter Moskowitz shows in How to Kill a City, gentrification is not a fad or a trend. Hipsters and yuppies have more buying power than the neighbors they often displace, but individual actors cannot control housing markets and remake cities on their own. Nor can gentrification be fully explained by developers either: while they might have similar interests, the part-time house flipper who owns five houses in New Orleans and the condo owner in Detroit do not coordinate policy with each other. There’s a losing side and a winning side in gentrification, but both sides are playing the same game?they are not its designers. How to Kill a City uncovers the massive, systemic, capitalist forces that push poor people out of cities and lure the young ?creative class.
London Under: The Secret History Beneath the Streets
London Under
The Secret History Beneath the Streets
Paperback      ISBN: 0307473783
The author of London: The Biography presents a chronicle of London's underground network of rivers, labyrinths and chambers and how they have been used in various time periods, from sewers and amphitheaters to crypts and tube stations.
After the World Trade Center: Rethinking New York City
After the World Trade Center
Rethinking New York City
Hardcover      ISBN: 0415934796
Essays consider the recovery of lower Manhattan after the destruction of the World Trade Center, looking back on New York's position as a financial and cultural capital and examining the forces that will shape the future of the World Trade Center site.
Citizen City: Vancouver’s Henriquez Partners Challenges Architects to Engage in Partnerships That Advance Cultural Sustainability
Citizen City
Vancouver’s Henriquez Partners Challenges Architects to Engage in Partnerships That Advance Cultural Sustainability
Paperback      ISBN: 1897476809
“Citizen City
Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution
Rebel Cities
From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution
Paperback      ISBN: 1788734920
Long before Occupy, cities were the subject of much utopian thinking. They are the centers of capital accumulation as well as of revolutionary politics, where deeper currents of social and political change rise to the surface. Do the financiers and developers control access to urban resources or do the people? Who dictates the quality and organization of daily life? Rebel Cities places the city at the heart of both capital and class struggles, looking at locations ranging from Johannesburg to Mumbai, from New York City to São Paulo. Drawing on the Paris Commune as well as Occupy Wall Street and the London Riots, Harvey asks how cities might be reorganized in more socially just and ecologically sane ways—and how they can become the focus for anti-capitalist resistance.
The Sphinx in the City: Urban Life, the Control of Disorder, and Women
The Sphinx in the City
Urban Life, the Control of Disorder, and Women
Paperback      ISBN: 0520078640
Elizabeth Wilson's elegant, provocative, and scholarly study uses fiction, essays, film, and art, as well as history and sociology, to look at some of the world's greatest cities—London, Paris, Moscow, New York, Chicago, Lusaka, and São Paulo—and presents a powerful critique of utopian planning, anti-urbanism, postmodernism, and traditional architecture. For women the city offers freedom, including sexual freedom, but also new dangers. Planners and reformers have repeatedly attempted to regulate women—and the working class and ethnic minorities—by means of grandiose, utopian plans, nearly destroying the richness of urban culture. City centers have become uninhabited business districts, the countryside suburbanized. There is danger without pleasure, consumerism without choice, safety without stimulation. What is needed is a new understanding of city life and Wilson gives us an intriguing introduction to what this might be.