Race and Ethnic Relations
Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Stamped from the Beginning
The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Paperback      ISBN: 1568585985
Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America--more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
White Fragility
Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
Paperback      ISBN: 0807047414
Groundbreaking book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when discussing racism that serve to protect their positions and maintain racial inequality Antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo first coined the term "white fragility" in 2011, and since then it's been invoked by critics from Samantha Bee to Charles Blow. "White fragility" refers to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially. These include emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors including argumentation and silence. In this book, DiAngelo unpacks white fragility, explaining the underlying sociological phenomena. She'll draw on examples from her work and scholarship, as well as from the culture at large, to address these fundamental questions: How does white fragility develop? What does it look like? How is it triggered? What can we do to move beyond white fragility and engage more constructively?
Black History in Its Own Words
Black History in Its Own Words
Hardcover      ISBN: 1534301534
Presents portraits of African American luminaries alongside the words that defined them and their times, including such figures as Angela Davis, Jean-Michel Basquiat, James Baldwin, Spike Lee, and Muhammad Ali.
The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America
The Black Presidency
Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America
Paperback      ISBN: 0544811801
Offers a provocative exploration into the meaning of America's first black presidency, and an analysis of how race and blackness shape our understanding of Barack Obama's achievements and failures, and America's racial future.
Riot and Remembrance: America's Worst Race Riot and Its Legacy
Riot and Remembrance
America's Worst Race Riot and Its Legacy
Paperback      ISBN: 0618340769
Drawing on period documents and interviews with survivors and their descendants, the author of Hurricane offers a definitive account of the 1921 race riot that destroyed the Greenwood section of Tulsa, Oklahoma, leaving hundreds of black residents dead, and describes the battle for belated justice and reparations to the victims. Reprint.
Solitary: Unbroken by Four Decades in Solitary Confinement, My Story of Transformation and Hope
Solitary
Unbroken by Four Decades in Solitary Confinement, My Story of Transformation and Hope
Hardcover      ISBN: 0802129080
Chronicles the author's extraordinary achievements as an activist during and after spending 40 years in solitary confinement for a crime he did not commit, describing how he has committed his post-exoneration life to prison reform.
Notes from No Man's Land: American Essays
Notes from No Man's Land
American Essays
Paperback      ISBN: 1555975186
A volume of essays by the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize-winning author of The Balloonists considers her mixed heritage as the daughter of a Jamaican father and white mother who embraces a West African faith, the legacy of the Reconstruction as taught in public schools, and the nation's misconceptions about pioneer nobility. Original.
The Inner Work of Racial Justice: Healing Ourselves and Transforming Our Communities Through Mindfulness
The Inner Work of Racial Justice
Healing Ourselves and Transforming Our Communities Through Mindfulness
Hardcover      ISBN: 059308392x
A law professor and mindfulness practitioner offers a road map to a more peaceful existence and describes how paying attention to our thoughts increases emotional intelligence, reveals unconscious bias and provides room to become less reactive when faced with injustice.
The Blood of Emmett Till
The Blood of Emmett Till
Paperback      ISBN: 1476714851
This extraordinary New York Times bestseller reexamines a pivotal event of the civil rights movement—the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till—“and demands that we do the one vital thing we aren’t often enough asked to do with history: learn from it” (The Atlantic). In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional. Only weeks later, Rosa Parks thought about young Emmett as she refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Five years later, Black students who called themselves “the Emmett Till generation” launched sit-in campaigns that turned the struggle for civil rights into a mass movement. Till’s lynching became the most notorious hate crime in American history. But what actually happened to Emmett Till—not the icon of injustice, but the flesh-and-blood boy? Part detective story, part political history, The Blood of Emmett Till “unfolds like a movie” (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), drawing on a wealth of new evidence, including a shocking admission of Till’s innocence from the woman in whose name he was killed. “Jolting and powerful” (The Washington Post), the book “provides fresh insight into the way race has informed and deformed our democratic institutions” (Diane McWhorter, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Carry Me Home) and “calls us to the cause of justice today” (Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, president of the North Carolina NAACP).
The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute To His White Mother
The Color of Water
A Black Man's Tribute To His White Mother
Paperback      ISBN: 159448192x
A young African-American man describes growing up in an all-black Brooklyn housing project, one of twelve children of a white mother and black father, and discusses his mother's contributions to his life and coming to terms with his confusion over his own identity. Reissue.