Black American Sociology
Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism
Ain't I a Woman
Black Women and Feminism
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 1138821519
"A classic work of feminist scholarship, Ain't I a Woman has become a must-read for all those interested in the nature of Black womanhood. Examining the impact of sexism on Black women during slavery, the devaluation of Back womanhood, Black male sexism,racism among feminists, and the Black woman's involvement with feminism, hooks attempts to move us beyond racist and sexist assumptions. The result is nothing short of groundbreaking, giving this book a critical place on every feminist scholar's bookshelf. "--
A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League
A Hope in the Unseen
An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League
Paperback      ISBN: 0767901266
Based on his Pulitzer Prize-winning articles in The Wall Street Journal, the author follows a determined black youngster from a violent school in Washington, D.C., to the bewildering world of the Ivy League. Reprint. $25,000 ad/promo. Tour.
Diversity, Inc.: The Failed Promise of a Billion-Dollar Business
Diversity, Inc.
The Failed Promise of a Billion-Dollar Business
Hardcover      ISBN: 1568588224
An award-winning journalist describes how well-intentioned and often costly workplace diversity initiatives have given way to a misguided industry and reveals the large gap between the rhetoric of inclusivity and actual accomplishments. 15,000 first printing.
Diesel Heart: An Autobiography
Diesel Heart
An Autobiography
Paperback      ISBN: 1681341255
Full of humor, toughness, hard work, and surprising vulnerability, this book shows the bitter weight of racism and the power of principled resistance.
So You Want to Talk About Race
So You Want to Talk About Race
Paperback      ISBN: 1580058825
In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard-hitting but user-friendly examination of race in America Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy--from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans--has put a media spotlight on racism in our society. Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair--and how do you make it right? How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend? In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to "model minorities" in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life. "Oluo gives us--both white people and people of color--that language to engage in clear, constructive, and confident dialogue with each other about how to deal with racial prejudices and biases." --National Book Review "Generous and empathetic, yet usefully blunt . . . it's for anyone who wants to be smarter and more empathetic about matters of race and engage in more productive anti-racist action." --Salon (Required Reading)
Heavy: An American Memoir
Heavy
An American Memoir
Paperback      ISBN: 1501125664
An essayist and novelist explores what the weight of a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception does to a black body, a black family, and a nation teetering on the brink of moral collapse.
So You Want to Talk About Race
So You Want to Talk About Race
Hardcover      ISBN: 1580056776
A Seattle-based writer, editor and speaker tackles the sensitive, hyper-charged racial landscape in current America, discussing the issues of privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. 10,000 first printing.
The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era
The Original Black Elite
Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era
Hardcover      ISBN: 0062346091
In this outstanding cultural biography, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Slave in the White House chronicles a critical yet overlooked chapter in American history: the inspiring rise and calculated fall of the black elite, from Emancipation through Reconstruction to the Jim Crow Era—embodied in the experiences of an influential figure of the time, academic, entrepreneur, and political activist and black history pioneer Daniel Murray. In the wake of the Civil War, Daniel Murray, born free and educated in Baltimore, was in the vanguard of Washington, D.C.’s black upper class. Appointed Assistant Librarian at the Library of Congress—at a time when government appointments were the most prestigious positions available for blacks—Murray became wealthy through his business as a construction contractor and married a college-educated socialite. The Murrays’ social circles included some of the first African-American U.S. Senators and Congressmen, and their children went to the best colleges—Harvard and Cornell. Though Murray and other black elite of his time were primed to assimilate into the cultural fabric as Americans first and people of color second, their prospects were crushed by Jim Crow segregation and the capitulation to white supremacist groups by the government, which turned a blind eye to their unlawful—often murderous—acts. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor traces the rise, fall, and disillusionment of upper-class African Americans, revealing that they were a representation not of hypothetical achievement but what could be realized by African Americans through education and equal opportunities. As she makes clear, these well-educated and wealthy elite were living proof that African Americans did not lack ability to fully participate in the social contract as white supremacists claimed, making their subsequent fall when Reconstruction was prematurely abandoned all the more tragic. Illuminating and powerful, her magnificent work brings to life a dark chapter of American history that too many Americans have yet to recognize.
W. E. B. Du Bois's Data Portraits: Visualizing Black America: The Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
W. E. B. Du Bois's Data Portraits
Visualizing Black America: The Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Hardcover      ISBN: 1616897066
The colorful charts, graphs, and maps presented at the 1900 Paris Exposition by famed sociologist and black rights activist W. E. B. Du Bois offered a view into the lives of black Americans, conveying a literal and figurative representation of "the color line." From advances in education to the lingering effects of slavery, these prophetic infographics—beautiful in design and powerful in content— make visible a wide spectrum of black experience. W. E. B. Du Bois's Data Portraits collects the complete set of graphics in full color for the first time, making their insights and innovations available to a contemporary imagination. As Maria Popova wrote, these data portraits shaped how "Du Bois himself thought about sociology, informing the ideas with which he set the world ablaze three years later in The Souls of Black Folk."
Known and Strange Things: Essays
Known and Strange Things
Essays
Paperback      ISBN: 0812989783
Provides essays on politics, photography, travel, history, and literature, as well as new interpretations of art, people, and historical moments.