Feminism
Revenge of the She-Punks: A Feminist Music History from Poly Styrene to Pussy Riot
Revenge of the She-Punks
A Feminist Music History from Poly Styrene to Pussy Riot
Paperback      ISBN: 147731654x
As an industry insider and pioneering post-punk musician, Vivien Goldman’s perspective on music journalism is unusually well-rounded. In Revenge of the She-Punks, she probes four themes—identity, money, love, and protest—to explore what makes punk such a liberating art form for women. With her visceral style, Goldman blends interviews, history, and her personal experience as one of Britain’s first female music writers in a book that reads like a vivid documentary of a genre defined by dismantling boundaries. A discussion of the Patti Smith song “Free Money,” for example, opens with Goldman on a shopping spree with Smith. Tamar-Kali, whose name pays homage to a Hindu goddess, describes the influence of her Gullah ancestors on her music, while the late Poly Styrene's daughter reflects on why her Somali-Scots-Irish mother wrote the 1978 punk anthem “Identity,” with the refrain “Identity is the crisis you can't see.” Other strands feature artists from farther afield (including in Colombia and Indonesia) and genre-busting revolutionaries such as Grace Jones, who wasn't exclusively punk but clearly influenced the movement while absorbing its liberating audacity. From punk's Euro origins to its international reach, this is an exhilarating world tour.
We Should All Be Feminists
We Should All Be Feminists
Paperback      ISBN: 110191176x
In this personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-admired TEDx talk of the same name—Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, award-winning author ofAmericanah, offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century, one rooted in inclusion and awareness. Drawing extensively on her own experiences and her deep understanding of the often masked realities of sexual politics, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman now—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.
Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds
Emergent Strategy
Shaping Change, Changing Worlds
Paperback      ISBN: 1849352607
Change is constant. The world, our bodies, our minds are in a constant state of flux. They are a stream of ever-mutating, emergent patterns. Rather than steel ourselves against such change, Emergent Strategy teaches us to map and assess the swirling structures, to read them as they happen, all the better to shape that which ultimately shapes us, personally and politically. A resolutely materialist spirituality based equally on science and science fiction. A wild feminist and afro-futurist ride! adrienne maree brown, co-editor of Octavia's Brood: Science Fiction from Social Justice Movements, is a social justice facilitator, healer, and doula living in Detroit.
You Don't Have to Like Me: Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism
You Don't Have to Like Me
Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism
Paperback      ISBN: 0142181684
"The author of Don't Worry It Gets Worse takes on the F-word Alida Nugent's first book, Don't Worry, It Gets Worse, received terrific reviews, and her self-deprecating "everygirl" approach continues to win the Internet-savvy writer and blogger new fans. Now, she takes on one of today's hottest cultural topics: feminism. Nugent is a proud feminist--and she's not afraid to say it. From the "scarlet F" thrust upon you if you declare yourself a feminist at a party to how to handle judgmental store clerks when you buy Plan B, You Don't Have to Like Me skewers a range of cultural issues, and confirms Nugent as a star on the rise"--
Dear Ijeawele, Or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions
Dear Ijeawele, Or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions
Paperback      ISBN: 0525434801
New York Times Best Seller A Skimm Reads Pick An NPR Best Book of 2017 From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today--written as a letter to a friend--and the perfect gift for Mother's Day. A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a childhood friend, a new mother who wanted to know how to raise her baby girl to be a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response: fifteen invaluable suggestions—direct, wryly funny, and perceptive—for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. Filled with compassionate guidance and advice, it gets right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century, and starts a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.
She's No Lady
She's No Lady
Hardcover      ISBN: 1932472649
In this spirited memoir of a Minnesota farm girl who became founding mother of the womenís movement, Fraser recounts her Depression-era upbringing, the early days of the DFL Party and her career in government. Introduction by Garrison Keillor.
A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story
A Taste of Power
A Black Woman's Story
Paperback      ISBN: 0385471076
The author recalls her years as a leader in the Black Panther Party, including her complicated relationship with fellow Panther Huey Newton, her own struggles with racism and sexism, and what ultimately destroyed the party
Vajournal: Feminist Interactions and Interventions
Vajournal
Feminist Interactions and Interventions
Paperback      ISBN: 1908714476
An interactive journal providing space to explore female experiences and ideas.
Choose Your Own Disaster
Choose Your Own Disaster
Paperback      ISBN: 1478970391
A staff writer for Entertainment Weekly revisits all of the terrible and life-changing decisions she made in her 20s while trying to find herself amidst the millennial experience and modern feminism. Original. 25,000 first printing.
Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower
Eloquent Rage
A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower
Hardcover      ISBN: 1250112575
With searing honesty, intimacy and humor too, America’s leading young black feminist celebrates the power of rage. Melissa Harris Perry says: “I was waiting for...an author who wouldn’t forget, ignore, or erase us black girls as they told their own story and that of the race and the nation. I was waiting and she has come—in Brittney Cooper.