Minnesota - Local History
The Girl in Building C: The True Story of a Teenage Tuberculosis Patient
The Girl in Building C
The True Story of a Teenage Tuberculosis Patient
Paperback      ISBN: 168134095x

In October 1943, sixteen-year-old Marilyn Barnes was told that her recent bout of pneumonia was in fact tuberculosis. She entered Ah-gwah-ching State Sanatorium at Walker, Minnesota, for what she thought would be a short stay. In January, her tuberculosis spread, and she nearly died. Her recovery required many months of bed rest and medical care.

Marilyn loved to write, and the story of her three-year residency at the sanatorium is preserved in hundreds of letters that she mailed back home to her parents, who could visit her only occasionally and whom she missed terribly. The letters functioned as a diary in which Marilyn articulately and candidly recorded her reactions to roommates, medical treatments, Native American nurses, and boredom. She also offers readers the singular perspective of a bed-bound teenager, gossiping about boys, requesting pretty new pajamas, and enjoying Friday evening popcorn parties with other patients.

Selections from this cache of letters are woven into an informative narrative that explores the practices and culture of a midcentury tuberculosis sanatorium and fills in long-forgotten details gleaned from recent conversations with Marilyn, who "graduated" from the sanatorium and went on to lead a full, productive life.

Weird Minnesota: Your Travel Guide to Minnesota's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets
Weird Minnesota
Your Travel Guide to Minnesota's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets
Hardcover      ISBN: 1402739087
Joined at the Hip: A History of Jazz in the Twin Cities
Joined at the Hip
A History of Jazz in the Twin Cities
Hardcover      ISBN: 0873518179

Jazz first churned its way into the Twin Cities on the Mississippi river excursion boats, which brought the likes of Jelly Roll Morton and Louis Armstrong to listeners on the levee--and it never left. When Paul Whiteman, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, and other jazz greats toured the clubs and concert halls of the Cities, young musicians listened in the alleys outside, bought records, and learned more of this exciting new music. The local scene began to nurture players like Lester Young and Oscar Pettiford, who went on to bigger things, as well as those who remained close to home to ply their craft, like Rook Ganz, Percy Hughes, Doc Evans, and Dave Karr.

Using an invaluable set of interviews taped with jazz personalities that were broadcast by Dave Sletten and Kent Hazen in the 1990s and rare photographs spanning the entire era, author Jay Goetting recounts the lore and explores the social aspects of the story: racism, the gangster era, unionization and strip joints, and the ever-evolving music itself.

Mark Rosen's Book of Minnesota Sports Lists: A Compilation of Bests, Worsts, and Head-Scratchers from the Worlds of Baseball, Football, Basketball, Ho
Mark Rosen's Book of Minnesota Sports Lists
A Compilation of Bests, Worsts, and Head-Scratchers from the Worlds of Baseball, Football, Basketball, Ho
Paperback      ISBN: 0760345805

Beloved sportscaster Mark Rosen presents a handpicked collection of fascinating sports memories from a range of athletes, journalists, and other prominent Minnesota voices. The Minnesota sports universe is filled with star players, memorable moments (good and bad), and controversial decisions that have long sparked debate and discussion among fans. In Mark Rosen's Book of Minnesota Sports Lists, local broadcasting legend Mark Rosen and co-author Jim Bruton present their own expert opinions and poll the biggest names from Minnesota and beyond to resolve those debates and provide the ultimate rankings of every sports question that the Minnesota fan has had to ask. No aspect of sport in Minnesota is left unturned, and Rosen includes the good, the bad, and the ugly from all levels of play: professional, college, high school, amateur, and recreational. Spanning the gamut of statewide sports - mascots, uniforms, sportswriters, movies and TV, sporting sites, and more - Rosen and Bruton explore the greatest on-field accomplishments, the biggest front-office gaffes, the forgotten heroes, the blown calls, and the scandals. Drawing from timeless Minnesota sports figures that include coaching legends, top athletes, journalists, and prominent public figures, the more than 100 lists included in Mark Rosen's Book of Minnesota Sports Lists will fascinate, infuriate, and invigorate Minnesota sports fans of all ages and passions.

The Relentless Business of Treaties: How Indigenous Land Became U.S. Property
The Relentless Business of Treaties
How Indigenous Land Became U.S. Property
Paperback      ISBN: 1681340909

The story of "western expansion" is a familiar one: U.S. government agents, through duplicity and force, persuaded Native Americans to sign treaties that gave away their rights to the land. But this framing, argues Martin Case, hides a deeper story. Land cession treaties were essentially the act of supplanting indigenous kinship relationships to the land with a property relationship. And property is the organizing principle upon which U.S. society is based.

U.S. signers represented the relentless interests that drove treaty making: corporate and individual profit, political ambition, and assimilationist assumptions of cultural superiority. The lives of these men illustrate the assumptions inherent in the property system-and the dynamics by which it spread across the continent. In this book, for the first time, Case provides a comprehensive study of the treaty signers, exposing their business ties and multigenerational interrelationships through birth and marriage. Taking Minnesota as a case study, he describes the groups that shaped U.S. treaty making to further their own interests: interpreters, traders, land speculators, bureaucrats, officeholders, missionaries, and mining, timber, and transportation companies.

Odds are, the deed to the land under your home rests on this system.

Too Hot, Went to Lake: Seasonal Photos from Minnesota's Past
Too Hot, Went to Lake
Seasonal Photos from Minnesota's Past
Paperback      ISBN: 0873516389

Boys with a sprinkler, nuns at a ball game, proud hunters with their quarry--this collection of more than three hundred pictures dating from the earliest cameras to the mid-twentieth century offers a trip back in time. Peg Meier, award-winning former reporter for the Star Tribune, also shares excerpts collected from diaries and letters that allow Minnesotans of ages past to comment on pine tree vistas, harvest bounty, and the weather, always the weather.

First published in 1993, the beloved Too Hot, Went to Lake promises a history of the state and its people that's easy to enjoy.

Black White Blue: The Assassination of Patrolman James Sackett
Black White Blue
The Assassination of Patrolman James Sackett
Hardcover      ISBN: 0873518705

On May 22, 1970, responding to a bogus emergency call to help a pregnant woman, St. Paul patrolman James Sackett was killed by a sniper's bullet fired from a high-powered rifle.

The white officer's assassination was the most shocking event in an era of shocking, racially charged events, punctuated by bombings at Dayton's Department Store and elsewhere, police harassment and shootings of young black men, an alleged hijacking plot, and random acts of urban violence. a once peaceful, close-knit community, St. Paul's summit-university neighborhood had reached a boiling point, heated by racism and rage.

Award-winning journalist William Swanson masterfully walks the razor-edge between the grief and anger of a police force that lost one of its own and the deep-seated resentment and subsequent silence of a community that had many reasons not to trust the cops. Based on extensive interviews and archival research, Black White Blue recounts the details of one of the most extraordinary cold-case sagas in U.S. annals--a story featuring dozens of memorable characters, including a relentless "super cop," an aggregation of conflicted informants, and a haunted woman who grew old with a terrible secret. The case culminates with the controversial trials, decades later, of Ronald Reed and Larry Clark. Black White Blue, is a powerful, true account of crime and punishment, time and memory, race, community, and personal relationships.

Koreans in Minnesota
Koreans in Minnesota
Paperback      ISBN: 1681341336

Minnesota has long been home to people from the Korean Peninsula--from early arrivals in the mid-twentieth century to their expanding family networks as well as students and professionals in the decades that followed. About thirty thousand Koreans live in Minnesota today, many of them first-generation immigrants. Many more are part of the Korean adoptee community, its members more strongly connected to Minnesota than any other state.
In this newest addition to the People of Minnesota series, Koreans in Minnesota introduces readers to the history of Korean immigration here, including settlement patterns and the formation of religious and social communities. Organizations ranging from the Korean American Association of Minnesota--the cornerstone of Korean immigrant society--to the Korean Service Center, which provides social services to elderly Koreans, to AK Connection, a networking alliance of adult adopted Koreans, to educational groups and institutions that teach the Korean language and culture help to tell the stories of this varied group.
Author Sooh-Rhee Ryu builds the narrative through interviews with community members and extensive archival work. A personal account by Mrs. Soon Ja Lee tells of arriving in 1953 and, along with her husband, helping to build Minnesota's Korean American community.

The Children of Lincoln: White Paternalism and the Limits of Black Opportunity in Minnesota, 1860-1876
The Children of Lincoln
White Paternalism and the Limits of Black Opportunity in Minnesota, 1860-1876
Hardcover      ISBN: 1517905281

How white advocates of emancipation abandoned African American causes in the dark days of Reconstruction, told through the stories of four Minnesotans


White people, Frederick Douglass said in a speech in 1876, were "the children of Lincoln," while black people were "at best his stepchildren." Emancipation became the law of the land, and white champions of African Americans in the state were suddenly turning to other causes, regardless of the worsening circumstances of black Minnesotans. Through four of these "children of Lincoln" in Minnesota, William D. Green's book brings to light a little known but critical chapter in the state's history as it intersects with the broader account of race in America.

In a narrative spanning the years of the Civil War and Reconstruction, the lives of these four Minnesotans mark the era's most significant moments in the state, the Midwest, and the nation for the Republican Party, the Baptist church, women's suffrage, and Native Americans. Morton Wilkinson, the state's first Republican senator; Daniel Merrill, a St. Paul business leader who helped launch the first Black Baptist church; Sarah Burger Stearns, founder and first president of the Minnesota Woman Suffragist Association; and Thomas Montgomery, an immigrant farmer who served in the Colored Regiments in the Civil War: each played a part in securing the rights of African Americans and each abandoned the fight as the forces of hatred and prejudice increasingly threatened those hard-won rights.

Moving from early St. Paul and Fort Snelling to the Civil War and beyond, The Children of Lincoln reveals a pattern of racial paternalism, describing how even "enlightened" white Northerners, fatigued with the "Negro Problem," would come to embrace policies that reinforced a notion of black inferiority. Together, their lives--so differently and deeply connected with nineteenth-century race relations--create a telling portrait of Minnesota as a microcosm of America during the tumultuous years of Reconstruction.

The Little Brown Jug: The Michigan-Minnesota Football Rivalry
The Little Brown Jug
The Michigan-Minnesota Football Rivalry
Paperback      ISBN: 1467112739

When the Michigan Wolverines arrived in Minneapolis to battle the Minnesota Gophers in 1903, a simple 30cents, five-gallon Red Wing stoneware water jug began football s first rivalry trophy game. The Little Brown Jug has been the subject of conspiracy theories, theft, national championships, and most of all pride, with each game s victor prominently displaying the jug on its campus until it is fought for again."