We are unable to process credit card payments for website orders at this time.

To place an order, you may proceed using a website gift card, or give us a call at 612-822-4611.

Thank you for your understanding, and we apologize for the inconvenience.
Massachusetts - Local History
Women of Martha's Vineyard
Women of Martha's Vineyard
Paperback      ISBN: 1609499034

Generations of women have traveled to Martha's Vineyard to find solace in its calming waves and varied shoreline. Many prominent and capable women set down roots, contributing to the fabric of the community on the island. Learn of the brilliant poet Nancy Luce, who lived in isolation with her chickens. Emily Post, whose name is synonymous with good manners, sought respite from her personal struggles on the Vineyard. Famed horticulturalist Polly Hill left a perennial legacy for islanders with her tranquil arboretum. In the twentieth century, novelist Dorothy West captured the beauty of Martha's Vineyard with her work. Historian Thomas Dresser provides a series of biographical sketches of these extraordinary women who were bound by their love of the island.

Worcester
Worcester
Paperback      ISBN: 0738538647

At the beginning of the 20th century, Worcester was one of the largest inland industrial cities in the world. The city boasted a diverse manufacturing base that drew immigrants from all over the globe. At this time, the postcard was a valuable and inexpensive way for friends and families to keep in touch with one another. The vintage postcards in Worcester show cherished recreation and leisure time in the city and highlight public places such as Elm Park. This book evokes memories of a simpler, slower-paced city.

Worcester County's Polish Community
Worcester County's Polish Community
Paperback      ISBN: 0738554545

Polish settlement in Worcester County had humble beginnings: a small group of German Poles in the 1870s. Over the next decades, thousands of Russian and Austrian Poles, fleeing economic and political hardship, pinned their hopes for a better life on jobs in the burgeoning industries of central Massachusetts. Practicing their religion in their native tongue was vital to these devout Catholics. New England s first Polish parish was founded in Webster, with others following in Worcester, Gardner, West Warren, Clinton, Southbridge, and Dudley. Polish clubs served as central gathering places in Gilbertville, Uxbridge, and South Grafton. Worcester County s Polish Americans share an intricate web of relationships family, religious, business, social, cultural, educational, political, and athletic that celebrates their heritage and sustains them today as one of the region s largest ethnic groups."

Worcester State University
Worcester State University
Paperback      ISBN: 1467128449

Founded in 1874 as Massachusetts's fifth normal school, Worcester State University has changed significantly while evolving from a teacher training school to a highly regarded public university in New England's second-largest city. Normal schools prepared teachers to enter classrooms through a curriculum of traditional coursework and innovative apprentice teaching. By 1932, when the normal school moved from its downtown location to the city's western edge, its name was changed to Worcester State Teachers College, and although it still stressed teacher preparation, the school began expanding its academic program and growing its campus. By 1963, it became Worcester State College, denoting the shift from a strictly teacher training school to a liberal arts and sciences college. New and unique programs proliferated, and graduate education increased student options. By 2010, Worcester State, like all Massachusetts state colleges, became a university, again signifying how much it had evolved in less than a half century. As Worcester State University approaches its 150th anniversary, this book illustrates some of the major changes in the institution's history.

Yarmouth
Yarmouth
Paperback      ISBN: 1467129267

Yarmouth, founded in 1639, has always had close ties with the sea. From shore whaling, fishing, and boatbuilding to sailing, salt making, and other maritime pursuits, almost everyone dealt with the ocean. A 160-acre Indian reservation existed until a smallpox epidemic in the 1770s. Later, a substantial Friends community (Quakers) grew in South Yarmouth. Yarmouth slowly leaned toward tourism after the Civil War, with railroads providing the transportation. Automobiles created even more tourism. People no longer stayed for the summer but could now spend just a night or two. Restaurants, dance halls, and cabins changed the landscape. There was little growth during the Depression; however, it was explosive in the years following World War II. Townspeople grudgingly adapted to these changes. The one constant has been the Bass River and its influence on the town.