Alaska - Local History
The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960
The Quiet World
Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960
Paperback      ISBN: 0062005979
The Quiet World is an epic history of the grassroots activists and artists who, with the U.S. federal government, saved vast reaches of wild Alaska from 1879 to 1960. Beginning with naturalist John Muir, who explored the towering glaciers of the Inside Passage, and ending with President Dwight Eisenhower, who created the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Brinkley showcases how extraction industry bigwigs were outfoxed by a colorful gallery of “wilderness believers,” including Bull Moose presidential candidate Theodore Roosevelt, indomitable U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, photographer Ansel Adams, U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Rachel Carson, and many others. Brinkley also details conservationists’ inspiration to protect Alaska’s natural resources for future generations and tells incredible stories of its wildlife. The Quiet World is an ode to the great Alaskan outdoors, and as we grapple with the perils of global warming and oil spills, it is essential reading.
The Great Quake: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet
The Great Quake
How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet
Paperback      ISBN: 1101904089
New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice In the bestselling tradition of Erik Larson’s Isaac’s Storm, The Great Quake is a riveting narrative about the biggest earthquake in North American recorded history -- the 1964 Alaska earthquake that demolished the city of Valdez and swept away the island village of Chenega -- and the geologist who hunted for clues to explain how and why it took place. At 5:36 p.m. on March 27, 1964, a magnitude 9.2. earthquake – the second most powerful in world history – struck the young state of Alaska. The violent shaking, followed by massive tsunamis, devastated the southern half of the state and killed more than 130 people. A day later, George Plafker, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, arrived to investigate. His fascinating scientific detective work in the months that followed helped confirm the then-controversial theory of plate tectonics. In a compelling tale about the almost unimaginable brute force of nature, New York Times science journalist Henry Fountain combines history and science to bring the quake and its aftermath to life in vivid detail. With deep, on-the-ground reporting from Alaska, often in the company of George Plafker, Fountain shows how the earthquake left its mark on the land and its people -- and on science.
Tip of the Iceberg: My 3,000-Mile Journey Around Wild Alaska, the Last Great American Frontier
Tip of the Iceberg
My 3,000-Mile Journey Around Wild Alaska, the Last Great American Frontier
Paperback      ISBN: 1101985127
Recounts the author's effort to retrace the historic 1899 Harriman Expedition around Alaska by using the state's public ferry system, and discusses how the lessons learned on the 1899 journey relate to Alaska's current environmental situation.
Leaving Alaska
Leaving Alaska
Hardcover      ISBN: 0871134764
An up-to-date exploration of the environmental problems and the symbolic importance of Alaska avoids easy polemics, taking into consideration the views of preservationists and oilmen, loggers and native Americans, and intimately showing America's last great frontier. Tour.
One Man's Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey
One Man's Wilderness
An Alaskan Odyssey
Paperback      ISBN: 0882405136
Shares the experience of living alone in the Alaskan wilderness
Alaska: A History
Alaska
A History
3rd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0806146664
Lifting a broad view of Alaska’s history out of the rich written record, Naske presents a narrative account of major developments from early times to the present with a multitude of illustrations, which depicts a state of great diversity of land, people, and economy. There are 26 chapters divided into five parts: the great land and its native people; Russian Alaska; U.S. Territorial Alaska; the State of Alaska; modern Alaska. Annotation ©2015 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)
An Alaska Anthology: Interpreting the Past
An Alaska Anthology
Interpreting the Past
Paperback      ISBN: 0295974958
In An Alaska Anthology, twenty-five contemporary scholars explore the region's pivotal events, significant themes, and major players, Native, Russian, Canadian, and American. The essays chosen for this anthology represent the very best writing on Alaska, giving great depth to our understanding and appreciation of its history from the days of Russian-American Company domination to the more recent threat of nuclear testing by the Atomic Energy Commission and the influence of oil money on inexperienced politicians. Readers may be familiar with an earlier anthology, Interpreting Alaska's History, from which the present volume evolved to accommodate an explosion of research in the past decade. While a number of the original pieces were found to be irreplaceable, more than half of the essays are new. The result is a fresh perspective on the subject and an invaluable resource for students, teachers, and scholars.

Arctic Homestead: The True Story of One Family's Survival and Courage in the Alaskan Wilds
Arctic Homestead
The True Story of One Family's Survival and Courage in the Alaskan Wilds
Paperback      ISBN: 0312283792
A chronicle of a family's efforts to build a home near the Arctic Circle in Alaska depicts their moving discovery of love and courage in a land of modern-day outlaws, feuds, grizzly bears and unbelievably harsh winters. Reprint.
Beyond Mile Zero: The Vanishing Alaska Highway Lodge Community
Beyond Mile Zero
The Vanishing Alaska Highway Lodge Community
Paperback      ISBN: 1550177974
In 1942, the west coast of North America was under threat after the attack on Pearl Harbor, prompting the US government to build a military road from Dawson Creek, BC, to Delta Junction, AK. Renowned as a driving challenge and for its remote scenic beauty, the Alaska Highway opened to the public in 1948. It was the beginning of the golden age of the automobile. Silvertip, Swift River, Silver Dollar, Krak-R-Krik, Chickaloon and other quaint and quirky establishments sprang up along the highway, offering travellers coffee, gas, conversation and a place to spend the night. During the roadhouse heyday, owners and employees lived on the frontier and earned good wages. Some were looking for a life-long commitment and a place to raise a family, others relished the isolation. Aside from truckers, today most people travel the Alaska Highway in fuel-efficient cars and self-sufficient RVs--the demand for lodge services has diminished and the businesses struggle to survive. Since December 2014, Yukoners Gontard and Kelly have been visiting operating and abandoned lodges, recording the unique culture of the Alaska Highway before it disappears completely. The book includes the recollections of Gay Frocklage, whose parents, Doris and Bud Simpson, ran one of the oldest roadhouses on the highway, Mile 716 Rancheria Lodge, Yukon; and Bud and Pam Johnson, who met at the Mile 1318 Tok Lodge, Alaska, were married six months later and ran the lodge for three decades; as well as Ross Peck whose parents, Don and Alene Peck, operated Mile 200 Trutch Lodge, BC, as a highway lodge and hunting outfitting base from 1950-1963. Featuring both archival and contemporary photographs, Beyond Mile Zero explores the evolution of Alaska Highway culture and will be of interest to locals and travellers alike.

Defiant Spirits: The Modernist Revolution of the Group of Seven
Defiant Spirits
The Modernist Revolution of the Group of Seven
Paperback      ISBN: 1553658825
Beginning in 1912, Defiant Spirits traces the artistic development of Tom Thomson and the future members of the Group of Seven, Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Franz Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley, over a dozen years in Canadian history. Working in an eclectic and sometimes controversial blend of modernist styles, they produced what an English critic celebrated in the 1920s as the “most vital group of paintings” of the 20th century. Inspired by Cézanne, Van Gogh and other modernist artists, they tried to interpret the Ontario landscape in light of the strategies of the international avant-garde. Based after 1914 in the purpose-built Studio Building for Canadian Art, the young artists embarked on what Lawren Harris called “an all-engrossing adventure”: travelling north into the anadian Shield and forging a style of painting appropriate to what they regarded as the unique features of Canada’s northern landscape. Sumptuously illustrated, rigorously researched and drawn from archival documents and letters, Defiant Spirits constitutes a “group biography,” reconstructing the men’s aspirations, frustrations and achievements. It details not only the lives of Tom Thomson and the members of the Group of Seven but also the political and social history of Canada during a time when art exhibitions were venues for debates about Canadian national identity and cultural worth.