U.s. Local History - Missouri
Land of the Burnt Thigh: A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders on the South Dakota Frontier
Land of the Burnt Thigh
A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders on the South Dakota Frontier
Paperback      ISBN: 0873511999

This tale of two sisters courageously homesteading on the prairie in 1907 provides a lively portrait of frontier life.

"Interesting in its spirit and atmosphere, and it is told simply and well. . . This is an unusual record, well worth reading."--New York Times Book Review

"Mrs. Kohl has told this story of South Dakota with a simplicity, a directness, and an understanding of its quietly heroic element which make her book an appealing as well as a significant contribution to the latter-day history of the pioneers."-Saturday Review

Falls of St. Anthony
Falls of St. Anthony
Paperback      ISBN: 0873512057

The Mississippi's major waterfall played an important role in the development of lumbering, flour milling, and hydroelectric power in Minneapolis. The revised edition contains more than 50 photographs and a new epilogue by the author describing the commercial development along the waterfront since the 1960s.

The Checkered Years: A Bonanza Farm Diary, 1884-88
The Checkered Years
A Bonanza Farm Diary, 1884-88
Paperback      ISBN: 0873512375

Mary Dodge Woodward, a fifty-six-year-old widow, moved from Wisconsin with her two grown sons and a daughter to a 1,500-acre bonanza wheat farm in Dakota Territory's Red River valley in 1882. For five years she recorded the yearly farm cycle of plowing and harvesting as well as the frustrations of gardening and raising chickens, the phenomenon of mirages on the plains, the awesome blizzard of 1888, her reliance on her family, and her close relationship with her daughter. She noted "blots, mistakes, joys, and sorrows" in her "olf friend." This Borealis edition brings back to print a valuable record of a frontier woman's life.

Minnesota in a Century of Change
Minnesota in a Century of Change
Paperback      ISBN: 0873512383

As the 20th century nears its close, 17 essayists look back over a hundred years of dramatic change in Minnesota. Drawing upon their expertise in such fields as historical geography, social history, and American studies, these writers create a multifaceted view of the ways in which Minnesotans have reshaped their state. Included in the book is Marjorie Bingham's essay devoted entirely to Minnesota women of the 20th century and their active role working for the right to vote, equal education, equal working opportunities and pay, and involvement in politics and religion.

Bring Warm Clothes: Letters and Photos from Minnesota's Past
Bring Warm Clothes
Letters and Photos from Minnesota's Past
by Meier
Paperback      ISBN: 0932272061

This best-selling book is a look at Minnesota's history as told through the letters, diaries and photographs of people who lived it. You'll find actual letters, journal entries, photos and more woven into a marvelous documentary of Minnesota. Discover what Minnesota was like for her people--explorers, farmers, homemakers, socialites, children, laborers, lawyers and lumberjacks. A classic in its 13th printing.

The 101 Ranch
The 101 Ranch
Paperback      ISBN: 0806110473

In the first third of the twentieth century, the 101 Real Wild West Show was known halfway round the world. It featured such headliners as Bill Pickett, the African-American inventor of bulldogging, and the future Hollywood film stars Tom Mix, Buck Jones, and Hoot Gibson. What was not so well known abroad was that the show stemmed from a real, working ranch that rivaled the fabled XIT Ranch in the folklore of the West.

Bohemian Flats
Bohemian Flats
Paperback      ISBN: 0873512006
The Bohemian Flats, first published in 1941, is a charming history of a small, isolated community that once lay on the west bank of the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, tucked underneath the Washington Avenue bridge. From the 1880s to the 1940s the village was home to generations of Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Irish, Polish, and especially Slovak immigrants. This book's vivid descriptions of their traditions and adaptations offer an unusual insight into Minnesota's multi-ethnic heritage.

The Bohemian Flats discusses the early years of settlement on the Flats, the lifeways and celebrations of the residents, and the razing of most of the neighborhood in 1932; it also provides recipes From the Flats Kitchens. This edition contains a new section of pictures of the Flats and an introduction by ethnic historian Thaddeus Radzilowski, who describes the genesis of the book in the WPA and answers more questions about the identities of those who lived on the Bohemian Flats.

The Cattle Towns
The Cattle Towns
Paperback      ISBN: 0803265611
Civil War on the Western Border, 1854-1865
Civil War on the Western Border, 1854-1865
Paperback      ISBN: 0803281269

The first phase of the Civil War was fought west of the Mississippi River at least six years before the attack on Fort Sumter. Starting with the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, Jay Monaghan traces the development of the conflict between the pro-slavery elements from Missouri and the New England abolitionists who migrated to Kansas. Bleeding Kansas provided a preview of the greater national struggle to come.

The author allows a new look at Quantrill's sacking of Lawrence, organized bushwhackery, and border battles that cost thousands of lives. Not the least valuable are chapters on the American Indians' part in the conflict. The record becomes devastatingly clear: the fighting in the West was the cruelest and most useless of the whole affair, and if men of vision had been in Washington in the 1850s it might have been avoided.

Dust Bowl Diary
Dust Bowl Diary
Paperback      ISBN: 0803279132

"Life in what the newspapers call 'the Dust Bowl' is becoming a gritty nightmare," Ann Marie Low wrote in 1934. Her diary vividly captures that "gritty nightmare" as it was lived by one rural family--and by millions of other Americans. The books opens in 1927--"the last of the good years"--when Ann Marie is a teenager living with her parents, brother, and sister on a stock farm in southeastern North Dakota. We follow her family and friends, descendants of homesteaders, through the next ten years--a time of searing summer heat and desiccated fields, dying livestock, dust to the tops of fence posts and prices at rock bottom--a time when whole communities lost their homes and livelihoods to mortgages and, hardest of all, to government recovery programs. We also see the coming to maturity of the author in the face of economic hardship, frustrating family circumstances, and the stifling restrictions that society then placed on young women. Ann Marie Low's diary, supplemented with reminiscences, offers a rich, circumstantial view of rural life a half century ago: planting and threshing before the prevalence of gasoline-powered engines, washing with rain water and ironing with sadirons, hauling coal on sleds over snow-clogged roads, going to end-of-school picnics and country dances, and hoarding the egg and cream money for college. Here, too, is an iconoclastic on-the-scene account of how a federal work project, the construction of a wildlife refuge, actually operated. Many readers will recognize parts of their own past in Ann Marie Low's story; for others it will serve as a compelling record of the Dust Bowl experience.