U.s. History - Vietnam Conflict
At War in the Shadow of Vietnam: United States Military Aid to the  Royal Lao Government, 1955-1975
At War in the Shadow of Vietnam
United States Military Aid to the Royal Lao Government, 1955-1975
Paperback      ISBN: 023107977x
The first book to recount the full story of U.S. covert operations in Laos during the Vietnam war. Based on newly declassified materials and interviews with dozens of key American and Lao officials, it examines the structure of the U.S. "secret war" in Laos and the long-term consequences associated with it.
Blood in the Hills: The Story of Khe Sanh, the Most Savage Fight of the Vietnam War
Blood in the Hills
The Story of Khe Sanh, the Most Savage Fight of the Vietnam War
Hardcover      ISBN: 1493019759
A soldier’s eye view of Vietnam’s fiercest close-quarters battle upon its 50th anniversary Khe Sanh’s Hill Fights of 1967—as experienced by co-author Bobby Maras and told in this hour-by-hour, day-by-day account—were carnage on the ground, much of it hand-to-hand fighting in the dark. Thanks to the brave Marines of the 9th and 3rd, Khe Sanh survived the first concentrated attack by the North Vietnamese to invade the South. After the Hill Fights, American forces pulled back and held out against constant enemy shelling and frequent attacks until the siege was broken. Combining Maras’ personal experiences with the war’s bigger picture, Blood in the Hills honors the heroic actions of our soldiers and shows how Khe Sanh was microcosm of the entire Vietnam War.
Bloody Sixteen: The USS Oriskany and Air Wing 16 During the Vietnam War
Bloody Sixteen
The USS Oriskany and Air Wing 16 During the Vietnam War
Hardcover      ISBN: 161234979x
"The Vietnam aircraft carrier USS Oriskany and its aviators come to life in a well-researched memorial to the fallen of Carrier Air Wing 16 (CVW-16). Fey explores how the disconnect between failed military strategy and the reality the crew of CVW-16 faced during Operation Rolling Thunder resulted in the highest loss rate of any carrier air wing during Vietnam"--
Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America
Bring the War Home
The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America
Paperback      ISBN: 0674237692
A Guardian Best Book of the Year
Bystanders to the Vietnam War: The Role of the United States Senate, 1950-1965
Bystanders to the Vietnam War
The Role of the United States Senate, 1950-1965
Paperback      ISBN: 1476668914
"Focusing on the U.S. Senate's role in the war, this history records the various senators' views in their own words. The author demonstrates that during the 20-year conflict--as throughout American history--the president was the principal formulator of policy on war and peace, including during the more recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan"--
Campus Wars: The Peace Movement at American State Universities in the Vietnam Era
Campus Wars
The Peace Movement at American State Universities in the Vietnam Era
Paperback      ISBN: 0814735126
"At the same time that the dangerous war was being fought in the jungles of Vietnam, Campus Wars were being fought in the United States by antiwar protesters. Kenneth J. Heineman found that the campus peace campaign was first spurred at state universities rather than at the big-name colleges. His useful book examines the outside forces, like military contracts and local communities, that led to antiwar protests on campus." ?Herbert Mitgang, The New York Times "Shedding light on the drastic change in the social and cultural roles of campus life, Campus Wars looks at the way in which the campus peace campaign took hold and became a national movement." ?History Today "Heineman's prodigious research in a variety of sources allows him to deal with matters of class, gender, and religion, as well as ideology. He convincingly demonstrates that, just as state universities represented the heartland of America, so their student protest movements illustrated the real depth of the anguish over US involvement in Vietnam. Highly recommended." ?Choice "Represents an enormous amount of labor and fills many gaps in our knowledge of the anti-war movement and the student left." ?Irwin Unger, author of These United States The 1960s left us with some striking images of American universities: Berkeley activists orating about free speech atop a surrounded police car; Harvard SDSers waylaying then-Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara; Columbia student radicals occupying campus buildings; and black militant Cornell students brandishing rifles, to name just a few. Tellingly, the most powerful and notorious image of campus protest is that of a teenage runaway, arms outstretched in anguish, kneeling beside the bloodied corpse of Jeff Miller at Kent State University. While much attention has been paid to the role of elite schools in fomenting student radicalism, it was actually at state institutions, such as Kent State, Michigan State, SUNY, and Penn State, where anti-Vietnam war protest blossomed. Kenneth Heineman has pored over dozens of student newspapers, government documents, and personal archives, interviewed scores of activists, and attended activist reunions in an effort to recreate the origins of this historic movement. In Campus Wars, he presents his findings, examining the involvement of state universities in military research ? and the attitudes of students, faculty, clergy, and administrators thereto ? and the manner in which the campus peace campaign took hold and spread to become a national movement. Recreating watershed moments in dramatic narrative fashion, this engaging book is both a revisionist history and an important addition to the chronicle of the Vietnam War era.
Carried to the Wall: American Memory and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Carried to the Wall
American Memory and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Paperback      ISBN: 0520213173
On May 9, 1990, a bottle of Jack Daniels, a ring with letter, a Purple Heart and Bronze Star, a baseball, a photo album, an ace of spades, and a pie were some of the objects left at the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial. For Kristin Hass, this eclectic sampling represents an attempt by ordinary Americans to come to terms with a multitude of unnamed losses as well as to take part in the ongoing debate of how this war should be remembered. Hass explores the restless memory of the Vietnam War and an American public still grappling with its commemoration. In doing so it considers the ways Americans have struggled to renegotiate the meanings of national identity, patriotism, community, and the place of the soldier, in the aftermath of a war that ruptured the ways in which all of these things have been traditionally defined. Hass contextualizes her study of this phenomenon within the history of American funerary traditions (in particular non-Anglo traditions in which material offerings are common), the history of war memorials, and the changing symbolic meaning of war. Her evocative analysis of the site itself illustrates and enriches her larger theses regarding the creation of public memory and the problem of remembering war and the resulting causalities
Charlie Company Journeys Home: The Forgotten Impact on the Wives of Vietnam Veterans
Charlie Company Journeys Home
The Forgotten Impact on the Wives of Vietnam Veterans
Paperback      ISBN: 1472827465
The Boys of '67 and the War They Left Behind The human experience of the Vietnam War is almost impossible to grasp
Charlie Company's Journey Home: The Boys of '67 and the War They Left Behind: The Forgotten Impact on the Wives of Vietnam Veterans
Charlie Company's Journey Home
The Boys of '67 and the War They Left Behind: The Forgotten Impact on the Wives of Vietnam Veterans
Hardcover      ISBN: 147282749x
Draws on interviews, letters, diaries and recordings in a compelling report of the human costs of veterans and their families in the form of PTSD, depression, substance abuse, suicide, broken families and homelessness.
Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam
Choosing War
The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam
Paperback      ISBN: 0520229193
In one of the most detailed and powerfully argued books published on American intervention in Vietnam, Fredrik Logevall examines the last great unanswered question on the war: Could the tragedy have been averted? His answer: a resounding yes. Challenging the prevailing myth that the outbreak of large-scale fighting in 1965 was essentially unavoidable, Choosing War argues that the Vietnam War was unnecessary, not merely in hindsight but in the context of its time. Why, then, did major war break out? Logevall shows it was partly because of the timidity of the key opponents of U.S. involvement, and partly because of the staunch opposition of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations to early negotiations. His superlative account shows that U.S. officials chose war over disengagement despite deep doubts about the war's prospects and about Vietnam's importance to U.S. security and over the opposition of important voices in the Congress, in the press, and in the world community. They did so because of concerns about credibility—not so much America's or the Democratic party's credibility, but their own personal credibility. Based on six years of painstaking research, this book is the first to place American policymaking on Vietnam in 1963-65 in its wider international context using multiarchival sources, many of them recently declassified. Here we see for the first time how the war played in the key world capitals—not merely in Washington, Saigon, and Hanoi, but also in Paris and London, in Tokyo and Ottawa, in Moscow and Beijing. Choosing War is a powerful and devastating account of fear, favor, and hypocrisy at the highest echelons of American government, a book that will change forever our understanding of the tragedy that was the Vietnam War.