Teen's History / United States / 20th Century
Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March
Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom
My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March
Paperback      ISBN: 0147512166
A memoir of the Civil Rights Movement from one of its youngest heroes--now in paperback will an all-new discussion guide.

As the youngest marcher in the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Albama, Lynda Blackmon Lowery proved that young adults can be heroes. Jailed eleven times before her fifteenth birthday, Lowery fought alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. for the rights of African-Americans. In this memoir, she shows today's young readers what it means to fight nonviolently (even when the police are using violence, as in the Bloody Sunday protest) and how it felt to be part of changing American history.

Straightforward and inspiring, this beautifully illustrated memoir brings readers into the middle of the Civil Rights Movement, complementing Common Core classroom learning and bringing history alive for young readers.
Master of Deceit: J. Edgar Hoover and America in the Age of Lies
Master of Deceit
J. Edgar Hoover and America in the Age of Lies
School & Library      ISBN: 0763650250
A fascinating and timely biography of J. Edgar Hoover from a Sibert Medalist.

"King, there is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is. . . . You better take it before your filthy, abnormal, fraudulent self is bared to the nation."

Dr. Martin Luther King received this demand in an anonymous letter in 1964. He believed that the letter was telling him to commit suicide. Who wrote this anonymous letter? The FBI. And the man behind it all was J. Edgar Hoover, the FBI's first director. In this unsparing exploration of one of the most powerful Americans of the twentieth century, accomplished historian Marc Aronson unmasks the man behind the Bureau- his tangled family history and personal relationships; his own need for secrecy, deceit, and control; and the broad trends in American society that shaped his world. Hoover may have given America the security it wanted, but the secrets he knew gave him -- and the Bureau -- all the power he wanted. Using photographs, cartoons, movie posters, and FBI transcripts, Master of Deceit gives readers the necessary evidence to make their own conclusions. Here is a book about the twentieth century that blazes with questions and insights about our choices in the twenty-first. Back matter includes an epilogue, an author's note, source notes, a bibliography, and an index.
The Acid King
The Acid King
Paperback      ISBN: 1481482289
Real stories. Real teens. Real consequences.

A murder in a small Long Island town reveals the dark secrets lurking behind the seemingly peaceful fa ade in this latest installment of the Simon True series.

On June 19, 1984, seventeen-year-old Ricky Kasso murdered Gary Lauwers in what local police and the international press dubbed a "Satanic Sacrifice."

The murder became the subject of several popular songs, and television specials addressed the issue of whether or not America's teens were practicing Satanism. Even Congress got in on the act, debating Satanic symbolism in songs by performers like AC/DC and Ozzy Osbourne. "The country is in crisis " screamed the pundits. After all, it was the height of the Reagan era and Nancy Reagan's "just say no" campaign was everywhere. But what this case revealed were bigger problems lurking at the heart of suburban America.

Ricky Kasso wasn't a bad kid, but he was lost. To feel better, he started smoking pot, moving on from that to PCP and LSD. He ended up living on the streets and thinking he had nothing to lose. Gary Lauwers went from being a victim of bullying to using drugs to fit in, and finally robbery--but then he made the mistake of stealing from Ricky, and from that moment on, his fate was sealed.

A few months later, Gary went into the woods behind the park with Ricky and two other boys. Only three of them came out.

The subsequent police investigation and accompanying media circus turned the village upside down. It shattered the image of an idyllic small town, changed the way neighbors viewed each other, and recast the War on Drugs.

The Acid King
The Acid King
Hardcover      ISBN: 1481482297
Real stories. Real teens. Real consequences.

A murder in a small Long Island town reveals the dark secrets lurking behind the seemingly peaceful fa ade in this latest installment of the Simon True series.

On June 19, 1984, seventeen-year-old Ricky Kasso murdered Gary Lauwers in what local police and the international press dubbed a "Satanic Sacrifice."

The murder became the subject of several popular songs, and television specials addressed the issue of whether or not America's teens were practicing Satanism. Even Congress got in on the act, debating Satanic symbolism in songs by performers like AC/DC and Ozzy Osbourne. "The country is in crisis " screamed the pundits. After all, it was the height of the Reagan era and Nancy Reagan's "just say no" campaign was everywhere. But what this case revealed were bigger problems lurking at the heart of suburban America.

Ricky Kasso wasn't a bad kid, but he was lost. To feel better, he started smoking pot, moving on from that to PCP and LSD. He ended up living on the streets and thinking he had nothing to lose. Gary Lauwers went from being a victim of bullying to using drugs to fit in, and finally robbery--but then he made the mistake of stealing from Ricky, and from that moment on, his fate was sealed.

A few months later, Gary went into the woods behind the park with Ricky and two other boys. Only three of them came out.

The subsequent police investigation and accompanying media circus turned the village upside down. It shattered the image of an idyllic small town, changed the way neighbors viewed each other, and recast the War on Drugs.
Because They Marched: The People's Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America
Because They Marched
The People's Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America
Hardcover      ISBN: 0823429210
The struggle for voting rights was a pivotal event in the history of civil rights.

For the fiftieth anniversary of the march for voting rights from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, Newbery Medalist Russell Freedman has written a riveting account of African-American struggles for the right to vote.

In the early 1960s, tensions in the segrated South intensified. Tired of reprisals for attempting to register to vote, Selma's black community began to protest. In January 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led a voting rights march and was attacked by a segregationist. In February, the shooting of an unarmed demonstrator by an Alabama state trooper inspired a march from Selma to the state capital. The event got off to a horrific start on March 7 as law officers brutally attacked peaceful demonstrators. But when vivid footage and photographs of the violence was broadcast throughout the world, the incident attracted widespread outrage and spurred demonstrators to complete the march at any cost.

Illustrated with more than forty archival photographs, this is an essential chronicle of events every American should know.

A Kirkus Best Book of the Year
A Junior Library Guild Selection
Because They Marched: The People's Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America
Because They Marched
The People's Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America
Paperback      ISBN: 0823435687
The struggle for voting rights was a pivotal event in the history of civil rights.

For the fiftieth anniversary of the march for voting rights from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, Newbery Medalist Russell Freedman has written a riveting account of African-American struggles for the right to vote.

In the early 1960s, tensions in the segrated South intensified. Tired of reprisals for attempting to register to vote, Selma's black community began to protest. In January 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led a voting rights march and was attacked by a segregationist. In February, the shooting of an unarmed demonstrator by an Alabama state trooper inspired a march from Selma to the state capital. The event got off to a horrific start on March 7 as law officers brutally attacked peaceful demonstrators. But when vivid footage and photographs of the violence was broadcast throughout the world, the incident attracted widespread outrage and spurred demonstrators to complete the march at any cost.

Illustrated with more than forty archival photographs, this is an essential chronicle of events every American should know.

A Kirkus Best Book of the Year
A Junior Library Guild Selection
Bootleg: Murder, Moonshine, and the Lawless Years of Prohibition
Bootleg
Murder, Moonshine, and the Lawless Years of Prohibition
Paperback      ISBN: 1250034272

Filled with period art and photographs, anecdotes, and portraits of unique characters from the era, this fascinating book by an award-winning author looks at the rise and fall of the disastrous social experiment known as Prohibition.

It began with the best of intentions. Worried about the effects of alcohol on American families, mothers and civic leaders started a movement to outlaw drinking in public places.

Over time, their protests, petitions, and activism paid off--when a Constitutional Amendment banning the sale and consumption of alcohol was ratified, it was hailed as the end of public drunkenness, alcoholism, and a host of other social ills related to booze. Instead, it began a decade of lawlessness, when children smuggled (and drank) illegal alcohol, the most upright citizens casually broke the law, and a host of notorious gangsters entered the public eye.

Bootleg: Murder, Moonshine, and the Lawless Years of Prohibition is fast-paced non-fiction perfect for anyone who's interested in American history, paricularly the 1920s, gangsters, bootleggers, the history of alcohol in the US, the Eighteenth Amendment and the Constitution, and American politics.


Read more thrilling nonfiction by Karen Blumenthal:
Hillary Rodham Clinton: A Woman Living History (A YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Award Finalist)
Tommy: The Gun That Changed America
Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different

Praise for Bootleg:

A Kirkus Best Teen Book of the Year
A School Library Journal's Best Nonfiction Book
A YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Finalist

"A fast-paced, gripping narrative . . . An informative, insightful account of a fascinating period of American history." --Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Gangsters, guns, and political battles--this book has them all--and presents them in compelling prose . . . a lively read." --School Library Journal, starred review

"Lively anecdotes and personal stories keep the reading brisk and often quite jovial." --Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, starred review

"A highly readable, well-shaped look at the Eighteenth Amendment . . . a top-notch resource." --Booklist, starred review

"The scope is ambitious, but Blumenthal investigates various tangents with telling anecdotes, quotes, statistics, photographs, and illustrations without losing her focus on the bigger picture. Whether you consider ongoing problems with substance abuse or increasingly polarized political discourse, the book is startlingly relevant to modern times in many ways, marking Blumenthal as one of the more intellectually adventurous authors writing for young adults today." --Horn Book Magazine
Boston Strangler
Boston Strangler
Library      ISBN: 1617832995

Put on your detective hat and uncover the facts and myths about the Boston strangler. Starting in 1962, eleven women living in and around the Boston area had been murdered in similar, and similarly brutal, ways. Many of these women had been sexually assaulted. Several had been stabbed. All had been strangled. Topics discussed include the victims, the atmosphere of Boston, Massachusetts, at the time of the murders, and the man who confessed to the murders, Albert DeSalvo. The evidence against DeSalvo, reasons DeSalvo confessed to murders he may not have committed, theories about who the Boston Strangler really was, and DNA evidence are also highlighted. Features include a Tools and Clues section that highlights research tools, technology, and investigative methods, a timeline, a glossary, selected bibliography, further readings, places to visit, source notes, and an index. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

Brown V. Board of Education: A Fight for Simple Justice
Brown V. Board of Education
A Fight for Simple Justice
Hardcover      ISBN: 0823436462
An award-winning author chronicles the story behind the landmark Supreme Court decision in this fascinating account for young readers.

In 1954, one of the most significant Supreme Court decisions of the twentieth Century aimed to end school segregation in the United States. The ruling was the culmination of work by many people who stood up to racial inequality, some risking significant danger and hardship, and of careful strategizing by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Award-winning author Susan Goldman Rubin tells the stories behind the ruling and the people responsible for it. Illustrated with historical photographs, this well-researched narrative account is a perfect introduction to the history of school segregation in the United States and the long struggle to end it. An epilogue looks at the far-reaching effects of this landmark decision, and shows how our country still grapples today with a public school system not yet fully desegregated.

Detailed backmatter includes a timeline, primary source texts, and summaries of all mentioned court cases.

An ALA Notable Children's Book
A Patterson Prize Honor Book
A Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year
Brown V. Board of Education: A Fight for Simple Justice
Brown V. Board of Education
A Fight for Simple Justice
Paperback      ISBN: 0823440354
An award-winning author chronicles the story behind the landmark Supreme Court decision in this fascinating account for young readers.

In 1954, one of the most significant Supreme Court decisions of the twentieth Century aimed to end school segregation in the United States. The ruling was the culmination of work by many people who stood up to racial inequality, some risking significant danger and hardship, and of careful strategizing by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Award-winning author Susan Goldman Rubin tells the stories behind the ruling and the people responsible for it. Illustrated with historical photographs, this well-researched narrative account is a perfect introduction to the history of school segregation in the United States and the long struggle to end it. An epilogue looks at the far-reaching effects of this landmark decision, and shows how our country still grapples today with a public school system not yet fully desegregated.

Detailed backmatter includes a timeline, primary source texts, and summaries of all mentioned court cases.

An ALA Notable Children's Book
A Patterson Prize Honor Book
A Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year