Germany - History - Third Reich
In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin
In the Garden of Beasts
Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin
Hardcover      ISBN: 0307408841
"Larson is a marvelous writer...superb at creating characters with a few short strokes."--New York Times Book Review

Erik Larson has been widely acclaimed as a master of narrative non-fiction, and in his new book, the bestselling author of Devil in the White City turns his hand to a remarkable story set during Hitler's rise to power.

The time is 1933, the place, Berlin, when William E. Dodd becomes America's first ambassador to Hitler's Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history.

A mild-mannered professor from Chicago, Dodd brings along his wife, son, and flamboyant daughter, Martha. At first Martha is entranced by the parties and pomp, and the handsome young men of the Third Reich with their infectious enthusiasm for restoring Germany to a position of world prominence. Enamored of the "New Germany," she has one affair after another, including with the suprisingly honorable first chief of the Gestapo, Rudolf Diels. But as evidence of Jewish persecution mounts, confirmed by chilling first-person testimony, her father telegraphs his concerns to a largely indifferent State Department back home. Dodd watches with alarm as Jews are attacked, the press is censored, and drafts of frightening new laws begin to circulate. As that first year unfolds and the shadows deepen, the Dodds experience days full of excitement, intrigue, romance--and ultimately, horror, when a climactic spasm of violence and murder reveals Hitler's true character and ruthless ambition.

Suffused with the tense atmosphere of the period, and with unforgettable portraits of the bizarre G ring and the expectedly charming--yet wholly sinister--Goebbels, In the Garden of Beasts lends a stunning, eyewitness perspective on events as they unfold in real time, revealing an era of surprising nuance and complexity. The result is a dazzling, addictively readable work that speaks volumes about why the world did not recognize the grave threat posed by Hitler until Berlin, and Europe, were awash in blood and terror.
Red Orchestra: The Story of the Berlin Underground and the Circle of Friends Who Resisted Hitler
Red Orchestra
The Story of the Berlin Underground and the Circle of Friends Who Resisted Hitler
Hardcover      ISBN: 1400060001

This is a poignant WWII story of a circle of ordinary Germans in Berlin who, through their contacts in film, theater, propaganda, academia, government and the military, conspired to bring down the Nazis.

Retreat from Moscow: A New History of Germany's Winter Campaign, 1941-1942
Retreat from Moscow
A New History of Germany's Winter Campaign, 1941-1942
Hardcover      ISBN: 0374249520

A gripping and authoritative revisionist account of the German Winter Campaign of 1941-1942

Germany's winter campaign of 1941-1942 is commonly seen as its first defeat. In Retreat from Moscow, a bold, gripping account of one of the seminal moments of World War II, David Stahel argues that instead it was its first strategic success in the East. The Soviet counteroffensive was in fact a Pyrrhic victory. Despite being pushed back from Moscow, the Wehrmacht lost far fewer men, frustrated its enemy's strategy, and emerged in the spring unbroken and poised to recapture the initiative.

Hitler's strategic plan called for holding important Russian industrial cities, and the German army succeeded. The Soviets as of January 1942 aimed for nothing less than the destruction of Army Group Center, yet not a single German unit was ever destroyed. Lacking the professionalism, training, and experience of the Wehrmacht, the Red Army's offensive attempting to break German lines in countless head-on assaults led to far more tactical defeats than victories.

Using accounts from journals, memoirs, and wartime correspondence, Stahel takes us directly into the Wolf's Lair to reveal a German command at war with itself as generals on the ground fought to maintain order and save their troops in the face of Hitler's capricious, increasingly irrational directives. Excerpts from soldiers' diaries and letters home paint a rich portrait of life and death on the front, where the men of the Ostheer battled frostbite nearly as deadly as Soviet artillery. With this latest installment of his pathbreaking series on the Eastern Front, David Stahel completes a military history of the highest order

Kl: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps
Kl
A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps
Hardcover      ISBN: 0374118256

Winner of the 2016 Mark Lynton History Prize
Winner of the 2015 Wolfson History Prize
A Wall Street Journal Best Book of 2015
A Kirkus Reviews Best History Book of 2015
Finalist for the National Jewish Book Award in the Holocaust category


The first comprehensive history of the Nazi concentration camps

In a landmark work of history, Nikolaus Wachsmann offers an unprecedented, integrated account of the Nazi concentration camps from their inception in 1933 through their demise, seventy years ago, in the spring of 1945. The Third Reich has been studied in more depth than virtually any other period in history, and yet until now there has been no history of the camp system that tells the full story of its broad development and the everyday experiences of its inhabitants, both perpetrators and victims, and all those living in what Primo Levi called "the gray zone."

In KL, Wachsmann fills this glaring gap in our understanding. He not only synthesizes a new generation of scholarly work, much of it untranslated and unknown outside of Germany, but also presents startling revelations, based on many years of archival research, about the functioning and scope of the camp system. Examining, close up, life and death inside the camps, and adopting a wider lens to show how the camp system was shaped by changing political, legal, social, economic, and military forces, Wachsmann produces a unified picture of the Nazi regime and its camps that we have never seen before.

A boldly ambitious work of deep importance, KL is destined to be a classic in the history of the twentieth century.

On Hitler's Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood
On Hitler's Mountain
Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood
Paperback      ISBN: 0060532181

Growing up in the beautiful mountains of Berchtesgaden -- just steps from Adolf Hitler's alpine retreat -- Irmgard Hunt had a seemingly happy, simple childhood. In her powerful, illuminating, and sometimes frightening memoir, Hunt recounts a youth lived under an evil but persuasive leader. As she grew older, the harsh reality of war -- and a few brave adults who opposed the Nazi regime -- aroused in her skepticism of National Socialist ideology and the Nazi propaganda she was taught to believe in.

In May 1945, an eleven-year-old Hunt watched American troops occupy Hitler's mountain retreat, signaling the end of the Nazi dictatorship and World War II. As the Nazi crimes began to be accounted for, many Germans tried to deny the truth of what had occurred; Hunt, in contrast, was determined to know and face the facts of her country's criminal past.

On Hitler's Mountain is more than a memoir -- it is a portrait of a nation that lost its moral compass. It is a provocative story of a family and a community in a period and location in history that, though it is fast becoming remote to us, has important resonance for our own time.

--Daily Mail (London)
The Nazi Hunters
The Nazi Hunters
Paperback      ISBN: 1476771871

More than seven decades after the end of the Second World War, the era of the Nazi Hunters is drawing to a close. Their saga is finally told in this "deep and sweeping account of a relentless search for justice that began in 1945 and is only now coming to an end" (The Washington Post).

After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. "Absorbing" (Kirkus Reviews) and "fascinating" (Library Journal), The Nazi Hunters focuses on the men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten.

The Nazi Hunters reveals the experiences of the young American prosecutors in the Nuremberg and Dachau trials, Benjamin Ferencz and William Denson; the Polish investigating judge Jan Sehn, who handled the case of Auschwitz commandant Rudolf H ss; the Mossad agent Rafi Eitan, who was in charge of the Israeli team that nabbed Eichmann; and Eli Rosenbaum, who sought to expel war criminals who were living in the United States. But some of the Nazi hunters' most controversial actions involved the more ambiguous cases, such as former UN Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim's attempt to cover up his wartime history. Or the fate of concentration camp guards who have lived into their nineties, long past the time when reliable eyewitnesses could be found to pinpoint their exact roles.

The story of the Nazi hunters is coming to a natural end. It was unprecedented in so many ways, especially the degree to which the initial impulse of revenge was transformed into a struggle for justice. The Nazi hunters have transformed our fundamental notions of right and wrong, and Andrew Nagorski's "vivid, reader-friendly account of how justice was done...is comprehensively informative and a highly involving read" (The Wall Street Journal).
Blitzkrieg: From the Rise of Hitler to the Fall of Dunkirk
Blitzkrieg
From the Rise of Hitler to the Fall of Dunkirk
Paperback      ISBN: 0061008036
A Testament to Freedom: The Essential Writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
A Testament to Freedom
The Essential Writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Paperback      ISBN: 0060642149

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was only thirty-nine years old in 1945 when he was executed in a Nazi concentration camp. However, his courage, vision, and brilliance have greatly influenced twentieth century theology. Bonhoeffer's work has profoundly shaped the thinking of many who work for spiritual, political and civil rights, including Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Liberation Theology proponent Leonardo Boff.

A Testament to Freedom spans Bonhoeffer's all too brief pastoral and theological career and includes excerpts from his major books, sermons, and selected letters. This magnificent volume takes readers on a historical and biographical journey that follows Bonhoeffer through the various stages of his life - teacher, pastor, seminary director, and ultimately, martyr in pursuit of peace and justice.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945) was a renowned and beloved Christian minister, seminary professor, and theologian who was imprisoned and later executed by the Nazis for his resistance to Hitler. He was the author of the bestselling classic The Cost of Discipleship, Life Together, and Letters and Papers from Prison.

Geffrey B. Kelly is professor of systematic theology at La Salle University in Philadelphia, and author of Liberating Faith: Bonhoeffer's Message for Today.

F. Burton Nelson (1920 - 2004) served as professor of Christian ethics at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago for thirty-six years, and is the author of The Story of the People of God.
The Devil's Diary: Alfred Rosenberg and the Stolen Secrets of the Third Reich
The Devil's Diary
Alfred Rosenberg and the Stolen Secrets of the Third Reich
Hardcover      ISBN: 0062319019

A groundbreaking World War II narrative wrapped in a riveting detective story, The Devil's Diary investigates the disappearance of a private diary penned by one of Adolf Hitler's top aides--Alfred Rosenberg, his "chief philosopher"--and mines its long-hidden pages to deliver a fresh, eye-opening account of the Nazi rise to power and the genesis of the Holocaust

An influential figure in Adolf Hitler's early inner circle from the start, Alfred Rosenberg made his name spreading toxic ideas about the Jews throughout Germany. By the dawn of the Third Reich, he had published a bestselling masterwork that was a touchstone of Nazi thinking.

His diary was discovered hidden in a Bavarian castle at war's end--five hundred pages providing a harrowing glimpse into the mind of a man whose ideas set the stage for the Holocaust. Prosecutors examined it during the Nuremberg war crimes trial, but after Rosenberg was convicted, sentenced, and executed, it mysteriously vanished.

New York Times bestselling author Robert K. Wittman, who as an FBI agent and then a private consultant specialized in recovering artifacts of historic significance, first learned of the diary in 2001, when the chief archivist for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum contacted him to say that someone was trying to sell it for upwards of a million dollars. The phone call sparked a decade-long hunt that took them on a twisting path involving a pair of octogenarian secretaries, an eccentric professor, and an opportunistic trash-picker. From the crusading Nuremberg prosecutor who smuggled the diary out of Germany to the man who finally turned it over, everyone had reasons for hiding the truth.

Drawing on Rosenberg's entries about his role in the seizure of priceless artwork and the brutal occupation of the Soviet Union, his conversations with Hitler and his endless rivalries with G ring, Goebbels, and Himmler, The Devil's Diary offers vital historical insight of unprecedented scope and intimacy into the innermost workings of the Nazi regime--and into the psyche of the man whose radical vision mutated into the Final Solution.

--Joaquin Jack Garcia, New York Times bestselling author of Making Jack Falcone
Bombing Hitler: The Story of the Man Who Almost Assassinated the Fahrer
Bombing Hitler
The Story of the Man Who Almost Assassinated the Fahrer
Paperback      ISBN: 163220312x

Georg Elser was just a working-class citizen living in Munich, Germany. He was employed as a carpenter and had spent some time working in a watch factory. That all changed when he took it upon himself, without telling his family or friends, to single-handedly attempt to assassinate the most powerful man in all of Germany: the F hrer, Adolf Hitler.

Elser's plan centered on the Munich beer hall, where he knew Hitler would be making a speech. Working slowly and in secret, he started to assemble the bomb that he would use to try to kill Hitler. When finished, the bomb was hidden in a hollowed-out space near the speaker's podium. The bomb went off successfully, killing eight people . . . but Hitler was not one of them.

Bombing Hitler is an incredible tale that takes you back to 1939 and recreates the steps that led Elser from the Munich beer hall, to his attempted escape across the Swiss border, and, sadly, to the concentration camp where his heroic life ended. Read for the first time the epic and tragic story of a man who stood up for what he knew was right, opposed the most powerful man in Germany, and came close to single-handedly ending the war.

Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.